News Jonny Benjamin (left) and Neil Laybourn meet after Mr Benjamin launched a campaign to find the stranger who stopped him from taking his life in 2008.

Now a mental health campaigner, Jonny Benjamin wanted to find the stranger so he could thank him

Kung Fu teacher jailed for sexual assaults

A kung fu teacher was today jailed for 18 months after sexually assaulting two young girls in anti-rape classes.

Errors & Omissions: Sometimes just the simple facts will do – and no fatuous extras

If you try to tart up simple information with topical chat you risk turning fatuous. An article on Wednesday about design discussed the origins of the word "ergonomics": "Those who are irritated by composites like Brangelina or Jedward won't like this, but ergonomics is a portmanteau word too – a combination of the Greek ergos and nomos (work and natural laws)."

Leading article: Level playing fields

Has the class war been won without a shot being fired? It's almost tempting to believe so on hearing the news that Eton College will allow pupils from the local state school to use its cricket pitches and rowing lake.

Post strike causes chaos for small businesses

Union representing 20,000 Royal Mail workers announces more action

Man held over police shooting

Detectives hunting a gunman who shot at two policemen have arrested a man on suspicion of attempted murder.

Ray Davies, Kenwood House, London

Ray of sunshine on wet home turf

Carer facing life for 'brutal' killing

A carer is facing life in jail after he was found guilty of carrying out a gunpoint execution "as bizarre as it is brutal" outside a trendy nightclub.

Terence Alexander: Actor who played the lovable rogue Charlie Hungerford in ‘Bergerac'

The role of Charlie Hungerford in Bergerac came to Terence Alexander after a screen career of playing villains and charmers. The shady, cigar-puffing tax exile who had made his fortune as a scrap dealer in the North of England was the ex-father-in-law of the Jersey Detective Sergeant Jim Bergerac (John Nettles), who had a gammy left leg and a drink problem.

Minor British Institutions: The Waterloo and City Line

The London Underground is, fair to say, a major British institution, world famous and rightly so. But the Waterloo and City Line – known as "The Drain" – is obscure even to most Londoners. Opened on 11 July 1898, it is a mere mile and a half long and serves just two stations, shuttling between Waterloo and Bank for the convenience of City commuters (except on Sundays, when it doesn't run).

The Firebringers, By Max Adams

If Shelley was the 'prophet of Prometheanism', then the romantic painter John Martin was its high priest

Robert Fisk's World: It’s been 250 years, but war still rages on the Plains of Abraham

The Québecois produce the most remarkable stories. I’m only here a couple of days and – bingo! – old Bill Fisk’s ghost awakes me once more. From the age of five, I would be forced to listen to Bill’s recitation of English history and, far too often, of the courage of General James Wolfe.

Shed reveals bid rejection

Shed Media, the television production company responsible for Bad Girls, Who Do You Think You Are? and Waterloo Road, yesterday admitted it turned down a management buyout last year.

Michael McCarthy: Enjoy cold winters while they last

Nature Notebook

Stride out into mining country

Somerset is known for cider, not coal. But Mark Rowe digs up its surprising past
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Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project
Diana Krall: The jazz singer on being friends with Elton John, outer space and skiing in Dubai

Diana Krall interview

The jazz singer on being friends with Elton John, outer space and skiing in Dubai
Pinstriped for action: A glimpse of what the very rich man will be wearing this winter

Pinstriped for action

A glimpse of what the very rich man will be wearing this winter
Russell T Davies & Ben Cook: 'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'

Russell T Davies & Ben Cook: How we met

'Our friendship flourished online. You can share some very revelatory moments at four in the morning…'
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef serves up his favourite Japanese dishes

Bill Granger's Japanese recipes

Stock up on mirin, soy and miso and you have the makings of everyday Japanese cuisine
Michael Calvin: How we need more Eric Cantonas to knock some sense into us

Michael Calvin's Last Word

How we need more Eric Cantonas to knock some sense into us