Manchester City boss Roberto Mancini offers no denial over Monaco talks

Manchester City manager Roberto Mancini has not denied reports that he spoke to Monaco last season.

Child benefit axe for the richest families an "excruciatingly difficult" decision, says Nick Clegg

Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg admitted today that axing child benefit for the richest families was an “excruciatingly difficult” decision.

£1.6bn wealth does not exist, says Chinese Premier Wen

Lawyers representing the family of the Premier, Wen Jiabao, have rejected claims made by The New York Times that they have accumulated at least $2.7bn (£1.6bn) in "hidden riches".

Last Night's Viewing: Hatfields & McCoys, Channel 5
Scandal, More4

"From here on out, I fight only for my own," announces "Devil" Anse Hatfield, as he prepares to desert from a group of retreating Confederates. When he says this, Anse sincerely believes that he's announcing his retirement from futile combat.

Staycation, staycation, staycation: Why Britain's holiday homes cast a dark cloud over our coastal resorts

More than a million of us now own at least one extra house. But where are all these second properties – and what are they doing to the communities around them?

We've chatted you up: British phrases go transatlantic

As a blog charts the rise of British terms entering US English our writer weighs up who's responsible for more linguistic atrocities - us or the Yankees?

Hamish McRae: March of the middle class powers global wealth rise

Economic View: The shift towards self-made wealth will increase as the balance of wealthy people moves from West to East

Richemont buys Swiss watch firm

The Swiss group behind the luxury brands Cartier, Jaeger-LeCoultre and IWC has snapped up a small watch parts maker.

Editorial: About more than a free bus pass

For all Lord Sugar's protestations about not claiming his free bus pass, Nick Clegg's central point remains: it is, indeed, difficult to explain why housing benefits must be cut while perks for wealthy pensioners remain protected.

Whitehall looks to the future with internship programme for young mandarins-in-waiting

Young Sir Humphrey Applebys they are not. Neither, frankly, do they bare much resemblance to aspiring Malcolm Tuckers. Nonetheless, the 60 teenagers, looking a little intimidated amid the garish turquoise and gold state rooms of the Foreign Office, are what the Civil Service believes are its future.

Colin Nicholls: The deputy mayor says the space is like a 'dinner party accessory'

Parking space in St Ives sells for £55,000

Parking is a premium in any town centre but in St Ives – the idyllic Cornish resort once home to Britain's artistic elite – a single space has just fetched £55,000.

At last: Frankie Dettori (in blue) drives Willing Foe to win the Ebor Handicap for the first time after 25 years of trying

Guarantee surges into Leger form

The son of Authorized sweeps to victory in Melrose Stakes and lines up a challenge to Camelot

Deconstructing Gaming: Sonic on the couch

The first in our semi-regular, and most certainly satirical, character assassinations of gaming's virtual icons.

Herbert (left) and Dorothy Vogel own a collection that features Carl Andre's works

The ordinary couple who amassed an extraordinary collection of modern art

On the surface, Herbert Vogel and his wife, Dorothy, lived an ordinary life in New York. Mr Vogel, who died on Sunday, aged 89, used to work nights sorting mail at the city's post offices, and his wife was a reference librarian in Brooklyn. But over the years, the couple built up one of the world's most unlikely – and most significant – collections of modern art, and bequeathed much of it to the National Gallery of Art in Washington.

Herbert (left) and Dorothy Vogel own a collection that features Carl Andre's works

The ordinary couple with an extraordinary art collection

How Herbert and Dorothy Vogel turned a one-bedroom flat into a treasure house

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Isis profits from destruction of antiquities by selling relics to dealers - and then blowing up the buildings they come from to conceal the evidence of looting

How Isis profits from destruction of antiquities

Robert Fisk on the terrorist group's manipulation of the market to increase the price of artefacts
Labour leadership: Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea

'If we lose touch we’ll end up with two decades of the Tories'

In an exclusive interview, Andy Burnham urges Jeremy Corbyn voters to think again in last-minute plea
Tunisia fears its Arab Spring could be reversed as the new regime becomes as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor

The Arab Spring reversed

Tunisian protesters fear that a new law will whitewash corrupt businessmen and officials, but they are finding that the new regime is becoming as intolerant of dissent as its predecessor
King Arthur: Legendary figure was real and lived most of his life in Strathclyde, academic claims

Academic claims King Arthur was real - and reveals where he lived

Dr Andrew Breeze says the legendary figure did exist – but was a general, not a king
Who is Oliver Bonas and how has he captured middle-class hearts?

Who is Oliver Bonas?

It's the first high-street store to pay its staff the living wage, and it saw out the recession in style
Earth has 'lost more than half its trees' since humans first started cutting them down

Axe-wielding Man fells half the world’s trees – leaving us just 422 each

However, the number of trees may be eight times higher than previously thought
60 years of Scalextric: Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones

60 years of Scalextric

Model cars are now stuffed with as much tech as real ones
Theme parks continue to draw in thrill-seekers despite the risks - so why are we so addicted?

Why are we addicted to theme parks?

Now that Banksy has unveiled his own dystopian version, Christopher Beanland considers the ups and downs of our endless quest for amusement
Tourism in Iran: The country will soon be opening up again after years of isolation

Iran is opening up again to tourists

After years of isolation, Iran is reopening its embassies abroad. Soon, there'll be the chance for the adventurous to holiday there
10 best PS4 games

10 best PS4 games

Can’t wait for the new round of blockbusters due out this autumn? We played through last year’s offering
Transfer window: Ten things we learnt

Ten things we learnt from the transfer window

Record-breaking spending shows FFP restraint no longer applies
Migrant crisis: UN official Philippe Douste-Blazy reveals the harrowing sights he encountered among refugees arriving on Lampedusa

‘Can we really just turn away?’

Dead bodies, men drowning, women miscarrying – a senior UN figure on the horrors he has witnessed among migrants arriving on Lampedusa, and urges politicians not to underestimate our caring nature
Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger as Isis ravages centuries of history

Nine of Syria and Iraq's 10 world heritage sites are in danger...

... and not just because of Isis vandalism
Girl on a Plane: An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack

Girl on a Plane

An exclusive extract of the novelisation inspired by the 1970 Palestinian fighters hijack
Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

Why Frederick Forsyth's spying days could spell disaster for today's journalists

The author of 'The Day of the Jackal' has revealed he spied for MI6 while a foreign correspondent