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The UK’s benefits and state pension are too low, the Council of Europe said yesterday – a claim that Work and Pensions Secretary Iain Duncan Smith dismissed as “lunacy”.

Single parents will ‘bear brunt’ of benefit cap

Single parents will be disproportionately affected by the new benefit cap, according to official figures, which show three-quarters of those affected on the pilot scheme are bringing up children alone.

There are more working mums than ever, but the gender pay gap is still here

Mums are now not only bringing home the bacon (on a budget), but are cooking it, serving it and washing up the plates afterwards

Maria Miller has pledged to improve representation of women

Lack of women at board level in sport 'a massive missed opportunity'

British Cycling is one of five national sporting governing bodies without a single woman on its board. Of the 46 national governing bodies (NGBs) that receive money from Sport England, British Cycling, England Squash and Racquetball, the British Wrestling Association, Goalball UK and GB Wheelchair Rugby still have all-male boards.

Ashes 2013: Alastair Cook confident Kevin Pietersen will be fit for third Test

Calf complaint has made batsman a doubt

The Future State Of Welfare With John Humphrys breached guidelines

BBC welfare state documentary presented by John Humphrys breached guidelines

A BBC documentary on the welfare state presented by John Humphrys breached guidelines on impartiality and accuracy, the BBC Trust's editorial standards committee has ruled.

Jessica Ennis-Hill of Great Britain competes in the Women's 100m Hurdles

Sainsbury's Anniversary Olympic Games: Jessica Ennis-Hill back on track

The London 2012 heptathlon champion, whose last hurdles race was at the Olympic Stadium last summer, clocked 13.08 seconds.

Jon Freeman: Why can’t all horses with broken legs be saved?

St Nicholas Abbey’s recovery depends on his temperament and avoiding complications

Don't neglect the importance of the humanities

Britain is at a crossroads. It needs the radical and thought-through responses which expertise from humanities and social science can provide

Lily Chamberlain: 'Teachers made no effort to combat the problem'

Children become more insecure, unhappy and isolated during recession, warns report

One in 10 youngsters in Britain has a low sense of well-being,  says Children’s Society

Eight injured as two trains crash into each other in Norwich

Greater Anglia service travelling at "low speed" hit an East Midlands train parked in station

Unspoken: Netmums’ Siobhan Freegard says child mental health is a taboo subject

Know your own children? Not well enough

Parents are often wide of the mark when it comes to their youngsters’ fears

The Red Arrows fly over Olympic Stadium during the Opening Ceremony for the 2012 Summer Olympic Games

Olympics legacy: A fortnight of positive attitudes is not enough

The Paralympics were a breakthrough moment. They were a great opportunity to think about disability in a different way and for disabled people to be much more visible.

Londoners sunbathing during their lunch hour in Green Park

MPs table Early Day Motion calling for workers to be sent home when thermometers hit 30C

Working in high heats can lead to a "reduction in cognitive function, attention span and visual motor tracking" and higher rates of accidents, the motion argues.

Tom Hodgkinson: The best thing to do after learning new information is to take a nap

Dr Johnson's favourite book was Robert Burton's bestselling 17th-century self-help guide The Anatomy of Melancholy. This exhaustive manual on madness and depression, first published in 1621, was so popular that, it was said, its publisher "got an estate by it". Johnson said it was the only book which would get him out of bed early.

Dai Greene could manage only second place in Gateshead last month

Athletics: Dai Greene pledges to restore normal service

World champion claims he has rediscovered his rhythm as Chambers chases place in Moscow

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Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine