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A Fathers4Justice campaigner has been found guilty of defacing a portrait of the Queen with purple paint while it was hanging in Westminster Abbey.

Pope praises Britain's WW2 fight against Nazis

Pope Benedict XVI praised Britain's fight against the Nazis today as he gave his first speech of his state visit to the UK.

1m pocket guides issued for Pope's UK visit

A million copies of a handbook including hymns, prayers and articles about the Pope's visit will be distributed to parishes across England, Scotland and Wales, the Catholic Church said today.

The private thoughts of Dr Livingstone, I presume

Historians decipher Scottish explorer's letters from deepest Africa

English Heritage shows how to get a head at the abbey

Purists angered by quango's choice of models for restored stonework at Westminster Abbey

Idwal Pugh: Civil servant, ombudsman and proud Welshman

Idwal Pugh was one of the ablest entrants to the Civil Service in the post-war reconstruction exam of 1946. He rose to be Permanent Secretary of the Welsh Office and then Parliamentary Commissioner for Administration and Health (the ombudsman).

Why autism is different for girls

We may think it only affects boys. But the female variant is often much harder to spot – and that means thousands of girls may be going undiagnosed. Jeremy Laurance reports

Tom Barnaby's cousin to take over Midsomer patch

Long-serving detective Tom Barnaby will be replaced by his cousin in ITV's Midsomer Murders as actor John Nettles steps down from the show, it was announced yesterday.

Remembrance Sunday: 'At least we knew what we were fighting for in 1944'

This year's commemorations were given added poignancy by events in Afghanistan. Cahal Milmo reports

My Week: General Sir John Kiszely

The president of the Royal British Legion on the biggest week of his year – and a demand for poppies that saw some areas run out

Mrs Gaskell gets her place in the sun

The once neglected creator of Cranford is to be commemorated in a window above Poets' Corner

How to map out a new role for yourself as a cartographer

If you like geography, are good on detail and have ace computer skills, you should consider a career as a cartographer

Leading article: In memoriam

The living link between the First World War and today's Britain might already have become largely symbolic. But with the deaths of Henry Allingham ten days ago, and of Harry Patch this weekend, that link has finally broken. And it is entirely fitting that the passing of this generation should be formally commemorated; the Prime Minister's proposal for a service at Westminster Abbey will surely be embraced.

Special WWI memorial to be held in the autumn

A special service to commemorate the sacrifices of the First World War generation is to be held in the autumn after the death of the last British survivor of the trenches, Harry Patch.

The last of the noblest generation

Harry Patch died yesterday aged 111. He was the nation's final living link to the horrors of the Western Front. <b>David Randall</b>, the last journalist to meet Private Patch, reports

Leading article: A peculiar idea

The Dean of Westminster Abbey is inviting the public to comment on bold plans to alter the London skyline by placing a corona – a feature in the shape of the crown – on the roof. Could this mark the start of round three of the war waged by a certain royal against carbuncles sprouting on the face of much-loved friends?

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Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine