News

A Fathers4Justice campaigner has been found guilty of defacing a portrait of the Queen with purple paint while it was hanging in Westminster Abbey.

Things to do in London for under £10

Time Out publishes an inspired new guide this week that takes on the credit crunch for London city-breakers, offering fun activities for under a tenner. Here are 10 of our favourites

We'll fight Brown on the beaches

D-Day veterans angry at 'politicisation' of anniversary

Anvil: the real-life Spinal Tap

Anvil are the Canadian rockers now taking cinemas by storm. The film's director Sacha Gervasi recalls their unforgettable first meeting

Lilian Carpenter: Leading figure at Westminster Abbey and supporter of interfaith dialogue

Lilian Carpenter went from the humblest of beginnings to preside over Westminster Abbey alongside her husband, the Rev Edward Carpenter, Dean of Westminster from 1974 to 1985. The Carpenters were widely esteemed for their warmth, accessibility, kindness and originality, and were among the most admired and cordial leaders of Westminster life.

Darwin's 'beard' on show for first time

Strands of hair believed to have fallen out of Charles Darwin's beard will go on show in public for the first time tomorrow in what is expected to be a blockbuster exhibition on the Victorian naturalist.

Romanno Bridge, by Andrew Greig

Robust, resourceful, a master of many forms but a slave to none, novelist and poet Andrew Greig knows how to deliver a full Scottish spread with all the tasty trimmings. Here, he serves up his second hearty helping of the John Buchan-style chase-thriller. Greig takes to the genre like a laird to a grousemoor.

MSP launches bid to move Mary's body to Scotland

Moves to have the body of Mary, Queen of Scots returned to Scotland will be initiated by a Nationalist MSP this week.

The Week In Books: A short story from debut to doom

A novelist I know predicts that, in the future, all novels will be first novels. He has a case. In the age of digital data, any writer's track-record at the tills can hang around their shoulders like an albatross (or an accountant). When marketing rules, and the chains and supermarkets slice off their pound of flesh, past numbers alone will often deter publishers from further investment in a loss-making property – however talented the victim. The days when benevolent ladies and gents in senior editorial roles would sign up an eager but untested stripling in the belief that their fourth book would start to make a serious impression have vanished as completely as the Havana or cognac after the four-hour lunch.

Last Night's TV: Heist, BBC4<br />Those Were The Days, ITV3

Lock, stock and scraping the barrel

Fram, National Theatre, London

A translator of Greek tragedies, a classical actress, and an explorer who almost reached the North Pole are the unlikely leads of a verse drama that travels through time and space, pitting fact against fiction, individualism against international cooperation. Tony Harrison's play, which he has directed with set designer Bob Crowley, doesn't so much debate the issues as bang a lot of assertions together and shower us with the sparks, but its vigour and nutty novelty are good value at a higher price than the £10 Travelex ticket.

Joan Smith: Roll up, roll up... See the Incredible Vanishing Princess

Acouple of centuries ago, the British royal family was growing increasingly anxious about the behaviour of the estranged wife of the king's eldest son. A secret inquiry took place, known as the "delicate investigation", which found no evidence to support a claim that the then Princess of Wales, Caroline of Brunswick, had become pregnant and given birth to a son. There is nothing delicate about the inquiry now taking place at London's High Court into the behaviour of Diana, Princess of Wales, even though the parallels between the careers of the two women are striking.

Bruce Anderson: Cameron's drug problem is not with the public, but with the party's traditionalists

Once he was willing to consider legalisation of drugs, but in recent years, he has changed his mind
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Dubrovnik, the Dalmatian Coast & Montenegro
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Lisbon, Oporto and the Douro Valley
Lake Garda, Venice & Verona
Spain
Prices correct as of 23 January 2015
Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

The enemy within

People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
Autumn/winter menswear 2015: The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore

Autumn/winter menswear 2015

The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore
'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

Army general planning to come out
Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

What the six wise men told Tony Blair

Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

25 years of The Independent on Sunday

The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

Homeless Veterans appeal

As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

Smash hit go under the hammer

It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

The geeks who rocked the world

A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

Growing mussels

Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project