News The number of forensic examinations carried out on victims of rape and serious sexual assault in London has plummeted despite a dramatic rise in attacks being reported to police (the picture was posed by models)

The number of forensic examinations carried out on victims of rape and serious sexual assault in London has plummeted despite a dramatic rise in attacks being reported to police.

Tevye the Dairyman, By Sholem Aleichem

Fiddler on the Roof took Aleichem's yarn-spinning, world-weary milkman from the shtetls of 1890s Ukraine to a global audience, but the musical did little for the standing of this best-loved of Yiddish writers.

Gallery Mess, Saatchi Gallery, Duke of York's HQ, King's Road, London SW3

The only officers' mess I've ever seen is on screen: the one in Cairo in Lawrence of Arabia, into which Peter O'Toole walks wearing his battle-scarred Arab robes and supporting a knackered Arab boy with whom he's just, triumphantly, walked through the desert. I remember the British officers holding pink gins, radiating disapproval and telling off the adventurer ("Now look here, Lawrence ...") for going native, poncing about in a djellaba and ("Throw them out, somebody ...") bringing his frightful Ganymede chum into the mess with him. I don't remember seeing any food. And it would have smacked of pretension if T E Lawrence had, in such circumstances, asked for a lunch menu and ordered the venison carpaccio.

Whitechapel Gallery Dining Room, 77-82 Whitechapel High Street, London, E1

The gentrification of east London gallops onward. You can hardly move in Shoreditch or Hackney these days without encountering a new private club or school-of-Mark-Hix restaurant. Whitechapel, long a place of anonymity, grot and serial murder, is on the turn as well. Through the windows of the Whitechapel Gallery's spanking new Dining Room – launched just after the Gallery's re-opening, following a two-year, £13.5m renovation that doubled its size – you look gloomily at the disused buildings across the High Street. But inside the Dining Room, everything is pure Primrose Hill, clean and new, tasteful and sweet-smelling.

Observations: Whitechapel gallery plays host to drama

Think of the Whitechapel Gallery in London's East End and your first thought is not likely to be theatre. But just a month after its grand reopening, between 8 May and 16 June, the gallery, in association with the National Theatre, will be hosting Tim Crouch's award-winning play England.

Whitechapel Reopening, Whitechapel Gallery, London

A refurbished and expanded Whitechapel Gallery reopens, giving pride of place to a disturbing masterpiece

Michael Ward

New Whitechapel Gallery: Modernism's new home

Jay Merrick takes a closer look at the gallery's metamorphosis

The Guernica Tapestry, Whitechapel Gallery, London

Picasso's fury screams out still

Picasso's 'Guernica' returns to London

A full-size replica of Pablo Picasso's anti-war painting, Guernica, was unveiled in London yesterday. The tapestry version on display at the Whitechapel Art Gallery has hung for 24 years just outside the UN Security Council chamber in New York.

Simon Shaps: The BBC's strength now risks damaging the competition

If a week is a long time in politics, then a matter of a few months feels like an eternity in television. It wasn't so very long ago that the BBC appeared to have legitimate cause for complaint about its £3bn-plus licence settlement. Programme budgets would need to be cut, expensive talent deals reined in, croissants axed – again – and, more recently, "off-site" bonding and brainstorming curtailed. The BBC has certainly not been shy about appearing in public wearing a hairshirt.

DVD: Whitechapel (15)

Like the East End's hipster invasion, there's unwelcome young blood on the Whitechapel beat.

Ripper fan jailed for murders

A killer who tried to emulate Jack the Ripper was today jailed for life for the murder of two young mothers at the start of what may have become a killing spree.

Curry house on a par with Gordon Ramsay

When Mohammad Tayyab heard about the sale of the cafe where he breakfasted daily on tea and toast before beginning work in a sweatshop in London's East End, the recently-arrived migrant seized the opportunity to do something about his yearning for the food of his native Pakistan.

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