News

To contrast the attitudes of the US Congress and the British Parliament, start with Iran. Today, the palpable welcome by MPs for Tehran’s suspension of high-level  uranium enrichment was matched only by anxiety about the UN excluding Iran from the Syria talks that start today in Switzerland.

Hague condemns Israel bus bombing

Foreign Secretary William Hague condemned the bombing of a bus in Jerusalem today as a "callous and disgusting act of terrorism".

UK announces £6 million funding to tackle piracy

Britain says it will spend £6 million pounds to tackle piracy in the Indian Ocean.

Village People: Cheesed off in Leicester

Cries of "control freakery" can be heard from the Labour stronghold of Leicester South, where party members will gather today to select a candidate for a by-election they can be pretty sure of winning.

William Hague warns over Israel settlements

Israeli settlement building "runs contrary to peace", William Hague said after calling for an end to new construction in talks with the country's defence minister.

Concerns deepen for UK citizens caught in Japan's disaster zone

The Foreign Secretary, William Hague, said yesterday there were "severe concerns" about British citizens who have not been located in Japan since last week's earthquake and tsunami, as the evacuation of all foreign nationalities increased.

The Sketch: Hague sends out a warning – but is anyone listening?

The great thing about a moral fog is it's suddenly obvious you don't know where you are. Everyone knows you don't know whether you're flying blind or sitting on the runway. Nowhere is this fog thicker than in the Middle East – and yet in the debate on the subject the Foreign Secretary refused to take advantage of this useful intelligence, and started making foggy demands.

Video: Hague: 'Severe concerns for Britons in Japan'

Foreign Secretary, William Hague, says British people should not go within 80km of the Fukushima nuclear power station.

Britons being flown out of Bahrain

Please see letter relating to this article published on 16 June 2011 from the Information Affairs Authority of Bahrain

Two charter planes are expected to fly British citizens out of strife-torn Bahrain today as the situation in the country continues to deteriorate.

William Hague dismisses resignation claims

William Hague has dismissed claims he has lost his "mojo" and is ready to resign as Foreign Secretary.

UK could send aid to Japan quake



Britain could send humanitarian assistance and search and rescue teams to Japan following today's devastating earthquake, Foreign Secretary William Hague has said.

Steve Richards: The rise and fall of William Hague

Sure-footed and quick-witted in opposition, William Hague was expected to be a Cabinet star. But now even close colleagues are questioning whether he's really cut out for power.

Business counts the cost of cyber crime

From industrial espionage to online theft, corporations are struggling to deal with the growing menace of cyber attacks

Ministers' support ebbs for Duke of York

Prince Andrew appeared to be losing the confidence of the Government in his role as trade ambassador, as reports emerged yesterday of ministers – including the Business Secretary Vince Cable – refusing to give him their backing.

Steve Richards: In the long shadow of the SDP

Party boundaries are under more strain than usual. The Ultra-Blairites, Cameroons and Cleggite Liberals dance to the same tune

Leading article: A message designed to be heard

In its foreign policy so far, the Coalition has managed to spring some welcome surprises. One of these has been a more pragmatic approach to the European Union than might have been expected, given the Eurosceptic noises made by Tories during the election. Now we have William Hague, issuing a very deliberate and very public warning to Israel's prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, about avoiding "belligerent language" during the present regional ferment. Overt, or even implied, criticism of the Israeli leadership is not something one would associate with a Conservative foreign secretary, and the timing could be seen as little short of inflammatory.

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The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

The difference between America and Israel? There isn’t one

Netanyahu knows he can get away with anything in America, says Robert Fisk
Families clubbing together to build their own affordable accommodation

Do It Yourself approach to securing a new house

Community land trusts marking a new trend for taking the initiative away from developers
Head of WWF UK: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

David Nussbaum: We didn’t send Cameron to the Arctic to see green ideas freeze

The head of WWF UK remains sanguine despite the Government’s failure to live up to its pledges on the environment
Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Author Kazuo Ishiguro on being inspired by shoot-outs and samurai

Set in a mythologised 5th-century Britain, ‘The Buried Giant’ is a strange beast
With money, corruption and drugs, this monk fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’

Money, corruption and drugs

The monk who fears Buddhism in Thailand is a ‘poisoned fruit’
America's first slavery museum established at Django Unchained plantation - 150 years after slavery outlawed

150 years after it was outlawed...

... America's first slavery museum is established in Louisiana
Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

Kelly Clarkson: How I snubbed Simon Cowell and become a Grammy-winning superstar

The first 'American Idol' winner on how she manages to remain her own woman – Jane Austen fascination and all
Tony Oursler on exploring our uneasy relationship with technology with his new show

You won't believe your eyes

Tony Oursler's new show explores our uneasy relationship with technology. He's one of a growing number of artists with that preoccupation
Ian Herbert: Peter Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

Moores must go. He should never have been brought back to fail again

The England coach leaves players to find solutions - which makes you wonder where he adds value, says Ian Herbert
War with Isis: Fears that the looming battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

The battle for Mosul will unleash 'a million refugees'

Aid agencies prepare for vast exodus following planned Iraqi offensive against the Isis-held city, reports Patrick Cockburn
Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

Yvette Cooper: We can't lose the election. There's too much on the line

The shadow Home Secretary on fighting radical Islam, protecting children, and why anyone in Labour who's thinking beyond May must 'sort themselves out'
A bad week for the Greens: Leader Natalie Bennett's 'car crash' radio interview is followed by Brighton council's failure to set a budget due to infighting

It's not easy being Green

After a bad week in which its leader had a public meltdown and its only city council couldn't agree on a budget vote, what next for the alternative party? It's over to Caroline Lucas to find out
Gorillas nearly missed: BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter

Gorillas nearly missed

BBC producers didn't want to broadcast Sir David Attenborough's famed Rwandan encounter
Downton Abbey effect sees impoverished Italian nobles inspired to open their doors to paying guests for up to €650 a night

The Downton Abbey effect

Impoverished Italian nobles are opening their doors to paying guests, inspired by the TV drama
China's wild panda numbers have increased by 17% since 2003, new census reveals

China's wild panda numbers on the up

New census reveals 17% since 2003