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Thirsty punters will mull over the outlook for pubs when Greene King and Spirit Pub Company report today and tomorrow respectively.

Frankie Cocozza axed from X Factor

Frankie Cocozza, the party-loving X Factor hopeful, has been axed from the ITV competition.

Thai PM opens the floodgates in desperate bid to save Bangkok

Thailand's new prime minister last night opted for a high-risk gamble to try and save Bangkok from devastating flooding by allowing some of the surging waters to enter the city.

Meehan's gradual approach leads to Improved results

Trying to coax another bid at 250,000 guineas, the auctioneer here yesterday made the preposterous claim that the colt before him would "look very cheap when he wins his maiden first time out". But if it is easy to overstate the value of a debut success, then nor should anyone be deceived that defeat first time out spells the end of the dream. That was when Sea The Stars suffered the only reverse of his career, after all, and at least one trainer would almost prefer his debutants to remain eligible for a second maiden.

Fallon handed St Leger mount aboard Panther

Though his own professional prospects seem increasingly restricted by the passing of time – whether through injury, or a boss who is giving youth its chance – Michael Owen showed yesterday that experience still counts for plenty in another field of athletic endeavour. The Manchester United striker authorised a decision that even Sir Alex Ferguson might admire as hard-nosed in the replacement of Richard Kingscote by Kieren Fallon when Brown Panther lines up for the sport's oldest Classic at Doncaster on Saturday.

Hannons' horse-trading puts flesh on the dream

So here they all were again, the agents and trainers and pin-hookers, appraising adolescent horses against their own, sober budgets and the deranged monologue of the auctioneers. While some had already been skirmishing overseas, in France or America, for many British and Irish professionals yesterday marked the resumption of a cycle as perennial and perplexing as migration: the yearling sales, this gruelling, addictive ritual, where over the coming weeks millions of pounds will ferment in the interstices of romance and commerce.

Investment Column: Aggreko has what it takes to power ahead

Bwin.party Digital Entertainment; Cape

Coolmore explore the 'logical' route for So You Think

Ireland's premier all-aged championship on Saturday so perilously resembles a lap of honour for So You Think, who counts two stablemates among just five potential opponents, that people already seem more interested in his next race. And there was a strong hint yesterday that a return to Australia for a third Cox Plate might be abandoned so that he can replace Coolmore's retired Derby winner, Pour Moi, in the Prix de l'Arc de Triomphe.

Investment Column: Bunzl's shares don't reflect its strengths

Paddy Power; Cupid

Leeds take a chance on injured Watkins in Wembley squad

Teenage centre only rated 50/50 to be fit to face odds-on favourites Wigan in Challenge Cup final

All systems go for Uncle Mo's comeback

A fairly pedestrian programme on British soil should prompt even the most insular into a brief glance across the Atlantic this weekend, where no fewer than seven Grade One races will establish the lie of the land for the European raiders at the Breeders' Cup this autumn. As things stand, the consensus remains that the American three-year-olds have failed to achieve a vintage standard – and that it could prove a very good year to take on the home team at their own game, on dirt in the Classic.

Like father, like son as Hills Jnr peaks early

It is, presumably, in the genes. On Saturday afternoon and evening, Barry Hills signed off from his 42 years as a trainer by saddling two winners, including his last runner, One Lucky Lady. Yesterday afternoon and evening, his son Charlie, his successor at Faringdon Stables near Lambourn, made the change of hands on the reins absolutely seamless by saddling two winners, including his first runner, Blaise Chorus.

Seventy-year-old man oldest to be arrested over riots

A 70-year-old man was the oldest person to be arrested in connection with recent rioting, it has emerged.

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Cameron Jerome
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Steve Shaw shows Kate how to get wet behind the ears and how to align her neck
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Standing room only: the terraces at Villa Park in 1935
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Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
Abuse - and the hell that came afterwards

Abuse - and the hell that follows

James Rhodes on the extraordinary legal battle to publish his memoir
Why we need a 'tranquility map' of England, according to campaigners

It's oh so quiet!

The case for a 'tranquility map' of England
'Timeless fashion': It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it

'Timeless fashion'

It may be a paradox, but the industry loves it
If the West needs a bridge to the 'moderates' inside Isis, maybe we could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive after all

Could have done with Osama bin Laden staying alive?

Robert Fisk on the Fountainheads of World Evil in 2011 - and 2015
New exhibition celebrates the evolution of swimwear

Evolution of swimwear

From bathing dresses in the twenties to modern bikinis
Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine