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2,200 jobs go in JJB Sports deal

Around 2,200 staff at JJB Sports were made redundant today after administrators closed 133 stores and agreed to sell 20 remaining outlets to Mike Ashley's Sports Direct International.

Outlaws' guns sold

Two guns thought to have been used by the bank-robbing fugitives Bonnie and Clyde fetched $210,000 (£135,000) at auction.

UK's unsettled weather set to continue

High winds and heavy rain battered England and Wales last night while parts of Scotland could face blizzard conditions later today as the unsettled weather continues.

The 10 Best Christmas markets

1. Leeds Christkindelmarkt

Until 18 December, leeds.gov.uk

Leeds' Millennium Square turns into a little bit of Germany with 40 visiting German traders, and there's even an authentic bierkeller.

Morte d'Arthur, Courtyard, Stratford-upon-Avon

Director Gregory Doran presents Thomas Malory's prose romance in a lucid, revelatory stage production. In a playing time of just three-and-a-half hours, we have the stories of the sword in the stone, the vision of Excalibur in the misty lake, the defeat of King Lot, the love triangle of Arthur, Guenever and Launcelot, the fellowship of the Round Table, the search for the Holy Grail, the jousts at Winchester, the usurpation of Mordred and the final battle.

Alfred the Great's granddaughter comes home

A lead box hidden inside a dusty tomb in Germany is the home of Alfred the Great's granddaughter, Queen Eadgyth. The tomb, opened in 2008 by archaeologists at Magdeburg Cathedral, carries the inscription “EDIT REGINE CINERES HIC SARCOPHAGVS HABET...” (the remains of Queen Eadgyth are in this sarcophagus...), and scientific tests on the bones inside have confirmed their owner's ancient identity.

More headlines

Lady Tess Swann: Organist, viola player and wife of Lord Swann

Many readers in Edinburgh will recollect the lovely lady who added to university occasions at which her husband, then Sir Michael Swann FRS, the vice-chancellor, (1965-1973) presided. Even more readers in London and throughout Britain will remember the charming hostess wife of Lord Swann, as he became when he was a hugely respected chairman of the board of governors of the BBC, 1973-1980. But Lady Tess Swann was far from being in her distinguished husband's slipstream. She was a talented musician: a sought-after viola player, and perhaps above all a superb organist, an associate of the Royal College of Organists.