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25 per cent of Russian men die before they are 55, study reports

Toronto, Canada's largest city; former US vice-president Dick Cheney

O Canada, you're too dangerous for Dick Cheney

Peter Ustinov once called Toronto "New York run by the Swiss", meaning that Canada's largest city has everything the Big Apple does, but is just a bit cleaner, friendlier, more efficient and – well, Swiss. It might be an overstatement but, as a big metropolis, it does feel safe. But not safe enough for former US vice-president Dick Cheney, who yesterday pulled out of a talk in the city due to fears about his safety. Is he right to be scared? What are Toronto's potential dangers?

Fuel poverty deaths three times higher than government estimates

The number of people dying as a result of fuel poverty is three times higher than government estimates suggest, according to new academic research.

Leading article: Antibiotic overuse threatens us all

That drug-resistant blood-poisoning cases in Britain have risen by 30 per cent in less than five years is concerning enough. That the official analysis judges the soaring cases of untreatable E.coli to be just the "tip of the iceberg" of antibiotic resistance should be a spur to more concerted efforts to address the problem.

UK cancer cases could surge 30 per cent, report warns

New cases of cancer could rise by 30 per cent in the UK by 2030, experts warned, with poor diet, heavy alcohol consumption and an ageing population likely to play a major role.

Malaria deaths twice as high as was thought

Malaria is killing almost twice as many people around the world than was previously thought, a study has shown.

Gordon Brown calls for Global Fund for Education

Former prime minister Gordon Brown has called for the creation of a worldwide fund to combat a "hidden and silent emergency in education".

Wallace and Gromit creators in leprosy row

The creators of Wallace and Gromit and Chicken Run are at the centre of an angry storm surrounding their latest film amid accusations of bad taste and disability discrimination.

Poultry cull in Hong Kong after two dead birds tested positive for the deadly H5N1 strain of bird flu

Bird-flu victim 'had no direct contact with poultry'

Alarm in China after bus driver dies, and, in nearby Hong Kong, 19,000 chickens have been slaughtered

Chinese bus driver dies of bird flu

A Chinese bus driver who tested positive for the H5N1 bird flu virus died in a city bordering Hong Kong today, health officials said.

Leading article: No escaping the dangers of tobacco

Given the history of half-truths and special pleading which characterise the public pronouncements of tobacco companies, many people will find it unsurprising that the latest analysis casts doubt on previous industry-backed studies into the safety of cigarette additives. Indeed, independent scientists now claim that research published by Philip Morris a decade ago actually "obscured findings of toxicity".

5.6m people in South Africa with HIV/Aids – the largest epidemic in the world

World Aids Day: Thirty-four million reasons to act

The Aids crisis has affected so many millions that the numbers can be difficult to understand. Here, we look at the statistics behind the epidemic.

Government says 15 suicides an hour in India

The Indian government says the rate of suicide is increasing in the country and more than 15 people kill themselves every hour.

David Salisbury: Polio - a scourge that should be wiped out

If India can stop the spread, why has it not been eliminated everywhere?

Leading article: A sensible review of breast screening

Does screening for breast cancer do more harm than good? Once, a question like that would have been dismissed as heretical nonsense. After all, according to the Government's official line, 1,400 lives a year are saved by screening. But over the past few years evidence has begun to be raised suggesting that the harm may outweigh the benefits. A "better safe than sorry" approach can lead to over-diagnosis and unnecessary mutilating surgery for a lesion that was not going to cause harm.

Contagion (12A)

Starring: Matt Damon, Jude Law, Kate Winslet

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Katie Hopkins appearing on 'This Morning' after she purposefully put on 4 stone.
peopleKatie Hopkins breaks down in tears over weight gain challenge
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Boris Johnson may be manoeuvring to succeed David Cameron
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peopleHis band Survivor was due to resume touring this month
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In this photo illustration a school student eats a hamburger as part of his lunch which was brought from a fast food shop near his school, on October 5, 2005 in London, England. The British government has announced plans to remove junk food from school lunches. From September 2006, food that is high in fat, sugar or salt will be banned from meals and removed from vending machines in schools across England. The move comes in response to a campaign by celebrity TV chef Jamie Oliver to improve school meals.
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'I’ll tell you what I would not serve - lamb and potatoes': US ambassador hits out at stodgy British food served at diplomatic dinners

'I’ll tell you what I would not serve - lamb and potatoes'

US ambassador hits out at stodgy British food
Radio Times female powerlist: A 'revolution' in TV gender roles

A 'revolution' in TV gender roles

Inside the Radio Times female powerlist
Endgame: James Frey's literary treasure hunt

James Frey's literary treasure hunt

Riddling trilogy could net you $3m
Fitbit: Because the tingle feels so good

Fitbit: Because the tingle feels so good

What David Sedaris learnt about the world from his fitness tracker
Saudis risk new Muslim division with proposal to move Mohamed’s tomb

Saudis risk new Muslim division with proposal to move Mohamed’s tomb

Second-holiest site in Islam attracts millions of pilgrims each year
Alexander Fury: The designer names to look for at fashion week this season

The big names to look for this fashion week

This week, designers begin to show their spring 2015 collections in New York
Will Self: 'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

Will Self takes aim at Orwell's rules for writing plain English
Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Toy guns proving a popular diversion in a country flooded with the real thing
Al Pacino wows Venice

Al Pacino wows Venice

Ham among the brilliance as actor premieres two films at festival
Neil Lawson Baker interview: ‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.

Neil Lawson Baker interview

‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.
The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

Wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding her husband
The model of a gadget launch: Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed

The model for a gadget launch

Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed
Alice Roberts: She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

Get well soon, Joan Rivers

She is awful. But she's also wonderful, not in spite of but because of the fact she's forever saying appalling things, argues Ellen E Jones
Doctor Who Into the Dalek review: A classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster

A fresh take on an old foe

Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering