Student

George W Bush was once president of controversial Delta Kappa Epsilon

Books: Dedicated follower of fashion

Dress historian Aileen Ribeiro has set Jean- Auguste-Dominique Ingres (1780-1867) up as the Mario Testino or the David Bailey of his day. Ingres's famous portraits - currently displayed at the National Gallery in London - show dark-eyed, solemn-faced women in opulent surroundings. They recline on brightly coloured satin sofas, their plump white arms resting on cushions; or stand next to draped tables, framed by dark, heavily patterned wallpaper. But what stands out is the clothes. Ingres meticulously recreates every detail of every crease, fold, tuck, bow, collar, bead and embroidery of these women's outfits. Looked at in this way, his work can be seen as documenting the subtly shifting fashions of the 19th century. Madame Marcotte de Sainte-Marie, seen above in a sketch for her finished portrait, wears a brown silk pelisse dress typical of the 1820s. The book includes colour plates alongside Ribeiro's essays on how the identities of Ingres's women are defined and moulded by what they wear.

Books: Art: The Britpack for breakfast

OSCAR WILDE quipped that "every portrait that is painted with feeling is a portrait of the artist, not the sitter". But even he may not have envisaged that a century later there would be artists whose oeuvre would consist of little but self-portraits: Gilbert and George, Anthony Gormley, Marc Quinn, Cindy Sherman...

Flawed logic led to brilliant pupil's death

A BRILLIANT schoolboy shot himself in the head after carefully calculating the benefits of life and deciding it was not worth living an inquest heard yesterday.

Brilliant pupil's 'logical' suicide

A BRILLIANT schoolboy shot himself in the head after carefully calculating the benefits of life and deciding it was not worth living, an inquest was told yesterday.

Robinson: a sorry mess of his making

Paymaster General's apology: How a catalogue of mistakes, mishaps and oversights led to his Commons statement

Design: Billboard Baudelaire

Walker Evans, the great photographer of the Depression era, was also a lifelong collector of signs. For him, the billboards, shopfronts and hand-painted signs of America contained a rough and revealing poetry

Books: From blindness to insight

Was Tina Brown right to sack this New Yorker star? Tony Gould thinks not; A Ved Mehta Reader: the craft of the essay by Ved Mehta Yale UP, pounds 12.50/ pounds 28, 416pp

Books: Unlike Victoria, they were amused

PLEASURE WARS The Bourgeois Experience: Victoria to Freud by Peter Gay, HarperCollins pounds 20

The two faces of Michael

Michael Laudor is a schizophrenic who battled with his demons and won. Hollywood paid $1.5m for his story; Brad Pitt was going to play him. But a tale of triumph over adversity has become a horror story. Michael Laudor cracked, and stabbed his pregnant girlfriend to death

Thursday's book: The Gentleman's Daughter: women's lives in Georgian England by Amanda Vickery ,Yale University Press, pounds 19.95

Students of English social history with even a passing knowledge of recent feminist writing will be familiar with the theory that the industrial revolution spelt the end of productive lives for elite Georgian women. The division of labour between the sexes grew from a gap into a yawning chasm between 1780 and 1850 with the rise of "separate spheres" for men and women. Factory-building husbands effected their wives' transformation into "angels of the hearth" whose days were cramped by custom, corset and crinoline. The struggle to escape from that suffocating cocoon is our contemporary legacy.

US firm in line to run schools for profit

AN AMERICAN company which runs schools for profit is holding discussions with the Government about taking over failing schools in Britain.

Obituary: Professor Myres McDougal

INTERNATIONAL law is not about neutral rules which states apply or ignore as power politics dictate. It is a particular form of authoritative decision-making, operating where power and authority coincide, and unashamedly directed towards the achievement of very precisely defined goals which necessarily are not value-free. This, in essence, is the policy science approach to international law, formulated by Myres McDougal in the 1950s and 1960s with the political scientist Harold Lasswell and elaborated and applied over the years with a variety of associates.

Calls to the Bar: Hilary Term 1998

Lincoln's Inn

Hidden gems among the Gothic spires of Yale

The 'Amistad' Africans, the subjects of Steven Spielberg's new film, were captured and taken to New Haven, Connecticut. Maxton Walker went voluntarily

Science: The end is nigh ... but not for a while

The universe is getting bigger - and nothing is ever, ever going to stop it. It's good news, as long as you don't mind the lights going out 100 billion years from now, says Charles Arthur.
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Whelks are healthy, versatile and sustainable - so why did we stop eating them in the UK?

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Siobhan-Marie O’Connor: Swimmer knows she needs Glasgow joy on road to Rio

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The true Gaza back-story that the Israelis aren’t telling this week

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New play by Oscar Wilde's grandson reveals what the Irish wit said at his trials

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Can scientists save the world's sea life from

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