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George W Bush was once president of controversial Delta Kappa Epsilon

Books: Dedicated follower of fashion

Dress historian Aileen Ribeiro has set Jean- Auguste-Dominique Ingres (1780-1867) up as the Mario Testino or the David Bailey of his day. Ingres's famous portraits - currently displayed at the National Gallery in London - show dark-eyed, solemn-faced women in opulent surroundings. They recline on brightly coloured satin sofas, their plump white arms resting on cushions; or stand next to draped tables, framed by dark, heavily patterned wallpaper. But what stands out is the clothes. Ingres meticulously recreates every detail of every crease, fold, tuck, bow, collar, bead and embroidery of these women's outfits. Looked at in this way, his work can be seen as documenting the subtly shifting fashions of the 19th century. Madame Marcotte de Sainte-Marie, seen above in a sketch for her finished portrait, wears a brown silk pelisse dress typical of the 1820s. The book includes colour plates alongside Ribeiro's essays on how the identities of Ingres's women are defined and moulded by what they wear.

Books: Art: The Britpack for breakfast

OSCAR WILDE quipped that "every portrait that is painted with feeling is a portrait of the artist, not the sitter". But even he may not have envisaged that a century later there would be artists whose oeuvre would consist of little but self-portraits: Gilbert and George, Anthony Gormley, Marc Quinn, Cindy Sherman...

Flawed logic led to brilliant pupil's death

A BRILLIANT schoolboy shot himself in the head after carefully calculating the benefits of life and deciding it was not worth living an inquest heard yesterday.

Brilliant pupil's 'logical' suicide

A BRILLIANT schoolboy shot himself in the head after carefully calculating the benefits of life and deciding it was not worth living, an inquest was told yesterday.

Robinson: a sorry mess of his making

Paymaster General's apology: How a catalogue of mistakes, mishaps and oversights led to his Commons statement

Design: Billboard Baudelaire

Walker Evans, the great photographer of the Depression era, was also a lifelong collector of signs. For him, the billboards, shopfronts and hand-painted signs of America contained a rough and revealing poetry

Books: From blindness to insight

Was Tina Brown right to sack this New Yorker star? Tony Gould thinks not; A Ved Mehta Reader: the craft of the essay by Ved Mehta Yale UP, pounds 12.50/ pounds 28, 416pp

Books: Unlike Victoria, they were amused

PLEASURE WARS The Bourgeois Experience: Victoria to Freud by Peter Gay, HarperCollins pounds 20

The two faces of Michael

Michael Laudor is a schizophrenic who battled with his demons and won. Hollywood paid $1.5m for his story; Brad Pitt was going to play him. But a tale of triumph over adversity has become a horror story. Michael Laudor cracked, and stabbed his pregnant girlfriend to death

Thursday's book: The Gentleman's Daughter: women's lives in Georgian England by Amanda Vickery ,Yale University Press, pounds 19.95

Students of English social history with even a passing knowledge of recent feminist writing will be familiar with the theory that the industrial revolution spelt the end of productive lives for elite Georgian women. The division of labour between the sexes grew from a gap into a yawning chasm between 1780 and 1850 with the rise of "separate spheres" for men and women. Factory-building husbands effected their wives' transformation into "angels of the hearth" whose days were cramped by custom, corset and crinoline. The struggle to escape from that suffocating cocoon is our contemporary legacy.

US firm in line to run schools for profit

AN AMERICAN company which runs schools for profit is holding discussions with the Government about taking over failing schools in Britain.

Obituary: Professor Myres McDougal

INTERNATIONAL law is not about neutral rules which states apply or ignore as power politics dictate. It is a particular form of authoritative decision-making, operating where power and authority coincide, and unashamedly directed towards the achievement of very precisely defined goals which necessarily are not value-free. This, in essence, is the policy science approach to international law, formulated by Myres McDougal in the 1950s and 1960s with the political scientist Harold Lasswell and elaborated and applied over the years with a variety of associates.

Calls to the Bar: Hilary Term 1998

Lincoln's Inn

Hidden gems among the Gothic spires of Yale

The 'Amistad' Africans, the subjects of Steven Spielberg's new film, were captured and taken to New Haven, Connecticut. Maxton Walker went voluntarily

Science: The end is nigh ... but not for a while

The universe is getting bigger - and nothing is ever, ever going to stop it. It's good news, as long as you don't mind the lights going out 100 billion years from now, says Charles Arthur.
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The saffron censorship that governs India: Why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression

The saffron censorship that governs India

Zareer Masani reveals why national pride and religious sentiment trump freedom of expression
Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Prince Charles' 'black spider' letters to be published 'within weeks'

Supreme Court rules Dominic Grieve's ministerial veto was invalid
Distressed Zayn Malik fans are cutting themselves - how did fandom get so dark?

How did fandom get so dark?

Grief over Zayn Malik's exit from One Direction seemed amusing until stories of mass 'cutting' emerged. Experts tell Gillian Orr the distress is real, and the girls need support
The galaxy collisions that shed light on unseen parallel Universe

The cosmic collisions that have shed light on unseen parallel Universe

Dark matter study gives scientists insight into mystery of space
The Swedes are adding a gender-neutral pronoun to their dictionary

Swedes introduce gender-neutral pronoun

Why, asks Simon Usborne, must English still struggle awkwardly with the likes of 's/he' and 'they'?
Disney's mega money-making formula: 'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan

Disney's mega money-making formula

'Human' remakes of cartoon classics are part of a lucrative, long-term creative plan
Lobster has gone mainstream with supermarket bargains for £10 or less - but is it any good?

Lobster has gone mainstream

Anthea Gerrie, raised on meaty specimens from the waters around Maine, reveals how to cook up an affordable feast
Easter 2015: 14 best decorations

14 best Easter decorations

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Paul Scholes column: Gareth Bale would be a perfect fit at Manchester United and could turn them into serious title contenders next season

Paul Scholes column

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Inside the Kansas greenhouses where Monsanto is 'playing God' with the future of the planet

The future of GM

The greenhouses where Monsanto 'plays God' with the future of the planet
Britain's mild winters could be numbered: why global warming is leaving UK chillier

Britain's mild winters could be numbered

Gulf Stream is slowing down faster than ever, scientists say
Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Government gives £250,000 to Independent appeal

Donation brings total raised by Homeless Veterans campaign to at least £1.25m
Oh dear, the most borrowed book at Bank of England library doesn't inspire confidence

The most borrowed book at Bank of England library? Oh dear

The book's fifth edition is used for Edexcel exams
Cowslips vs honeysuckle: The hunt for the UK’s favourite wildflower

Cowslips vs honeysuckle

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Child abuse scandal: Did a botched blackmail attempt by South African intelligence help Cyril Smith escape justice?

Did a botched blackmail attempt help Cyril Smith escape justice?

A fresh twist reveals the Liberal MP was targeted by the notorious South African intelligence agency Boss