Student

George W Bush was once president of controversial Delta Kappa Epsilon

BOOKS / Soaring aspirations: High-rise living was the planners' Utopian dream that soon turned sour, but Andrew O'Hagan finds hope, as well as sobering lessons, in a new study of the tower block in Britain: Tower Block: Modern Public Housing in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland - Miles Glendinning and Stefan Muthesius: Yale, pounds 40

MY AUNT FAMIE lived on the 18th floor. She'd skipped out of her Cranhill tenement in the early Seventies - footloose and family-free - to take up residence high in the air over Sandyhills, in the majestic Balbeggie Flats, over towards the east end of Glasgow. She never had reason to regret the move, and neither did I, twisting myself upside down on the freshly planted monkey-bars in the park below. As places went, this was superb: I'd screw down to the bottom rung and settle my juvenile mop-top on to the gravel, from where I could count down the shimmering panels, the silvery windows, until I came to the one where Famie waved both her arms and beamed like the unsung queen of the block.

BOOK REVIEw / Lazy losels and luskish youths: 'Adolescence and Youth in Early Modern England' - Ilana Krausman Ben-Amos: Yale, 25 pounds

AUTHOR doesn't quote the Old Shepherd from The Winter's Tale: 'I would there were no age between ten and three-and-twenty, or that youth would sleep out the rest, for there is nothing in the between but getting wenches with child, wronging the ancientry, stealing, fighting.'

Obituary: Professor Cleanth Brooks

Cleanth Brooks, literary critic: born Murray, Kentucky 16 October 1906; Lecturer / Professor, Louisiana State University 1932-47; Managing Editor / Editor (with Robert Penn Warren), the Southern Review 1935-42; Professor of English / Gray Professor of Rhetoric, Yale University 1947-75 (Emeritus); Cultural Attache, US Embassy, London 1964-66; Jefferson Lecturer, National Endowment for the Humanities 1985; married 1934 Edith Blanchard (died 1986); died New Haven, Connecticut 10 May 1994.

BOOK REVIEW / Hero without a biscuit or a mausoleum: 'Mazzini' - Denis Mack Smith: Yale, 19.95 pounds

NO ONE named a biscuit after Giuseppe Mazzini; another Giuseppe, the flamboyant Garibaldi, gave his name to both a biscuit and a loosefitting blouse. Every Italian town has a Piazza Garibaldi, but rarely have I seen a Piazza Mazzini.

Happy Anniversary: French engage in a mid-air fit of pique

HERE are some of the justly neglected anniversaries of the week, writes William Hartston.

BOOK REVIEW / Striptease of a Russian icon: 'Strolls with Pushkin' - Abram Tertz, trs Catherine Nepomnyashchy & Slava Ystremski: Yale, 17.95 pounds

ALEXANDER PUSHKIN's death in 1837 at the age of 37 in a duel with his wife's lover was surrounded by an aura of scandalous heroism, and after wild scenes of grief at his funeral the authorities spirited his body out of St Petersburg at night. Yet Pushkin has survived the collapse of rulers and political systems to overshadow all other poets as Russia's cultural hero.

BOOK REVIEW / History where the maps are spread: Correction

The book reviewed on Tuesday, 'Marsigli's Europe', is published by Yale at pounds 29.95, not pounds 9.95 as was stated.

BOOK REVIEW / History, where the maps are spread: Marsigli's Europe 1680-1730 - John Stoye: Yale, pounds 29.95 (CORRECTED)

CORRECTION (PUBLISHED 24 MARCH 1994) INCORPORATED INTO THIS ARTICLE

BOOK REVIEW / Passe but not forgotten: The past in French History - Robert Gildea: Yale, pounds 30; Arguing revolution: The Intellectual Left in Postwar France - Sunil Khilnani: Yale, pounds 19.95

WE HAVE got used to the idea that many of the characteristics traditionally supposed to divide European nations from one another are being eroded. These two studies, however, are reminders that, at the level of political culture, there really is something quite distinct about the French. Their life is no more centred on petanque and chevre than life here accords with John Major's vision of warm bitter and the village green, but they are preoccupied with their past in a way the British - or at least the English - are not.

Health Update: Coffee break

WOMEN who are finding it difficult to conceive should cut down on coffee, according to research published in the American Journal of Epidemiology. A study of 1,909 women carried out by researchers at Yale University medical school showed that drinking more than three cups of coffee a day more than doubles the chances of conception being delayed by a year.

BOOK REVIEW / Strange case of a museum man: 'Richard Owen: Victorian Naturalist' - Nicolaas A Rupke: Yale, 35 pounds

IF YOU were interested in natural history a hundred years ago, you couldn't escape Richard Owen. He was a star palaeontologist, the most famous scientist of the Victorian period. His name was mentioned in the same breath as Isaac Newton's, and his company was sought by royalty, prime ministers and literati. So what happened? Nicolaas Rupke's intelligent, readable book explores the reasons why Owen was all but forgotten within a decade of his death in 1892 - or, worse still, remembered with a sneer.

BOOK REVIEW / Are you feeling sleepy? It's only a magnetic crisis: 'From Mesmer to Freud: Magnetic Sleep and the Roots of Psychological Healing' - Adam Crabtree: Yale, 30 pounds

OF ALL the mysteries of the human mind, hypnotism is probably the most striking, yet least understood. Anyone who has seen a good stage hypnotist will know that suitable subjects can be manipulated in the most surprising ways. But academic psychology offers no satisfactory explanation for hypnosis. Nor is there very much serious investigation of its workings, outside the world of smoking cures and fringe psychotherapy.

BOOK REVIEW / Fascinating theories of laughter and forgetting: World changes in divorce patterns - William J Goode: Yale, pounds 27.50

THE LORD CHANCELLOR's announcement of the Green Paper on divorce legislation should intensify demand for this fascinating book on cross-cultural trends in divorce. William J Goode is that rare bird, a sociologist who adventures beyond his statistics and chances his arm with speculation about What it all Means. Twenty years ago he wrote a book on world changes in family patterns which is still worth reading. Now he gives us the fruit of long labours in amassing and comparing divorce customs from Mecca to Manchester, Tokyo to Tennessee.

BOOKS FOR CHRISTMAS / Art & Photography: Poetry and sex in every stocking

MOST ART books written by academics are on the timid and careful side, so it's a pleasure to encounter John Gage's Colour and Culture (Thames & Hudson pounds 38) which tries to consider everything, literally everything, that has been thought about colour from the ancient Greeks to the present day. No wonder that the bibliography lists 2,400 items. But this immense survey isn't just for scholars. Gage has the rare ability to make colour theory interesting, and he stresses the human as well as the artistic side of his subject. Rightly so, too, for colour, consciously or unconsciously, affects all our lives. A courageous book.
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