Rebecca Warren, Serpentine Gallery, London

Once upon a time, artists used their hands and eyes to create art. The brain alone is no substitute

Pandora: Heston's Little Chef manager moves on

Heston Blumenthal is usually regarded as the most mild-mannered of our leading super chefs, so I do hope one of the subjects of his latest foray into television hasn't been left badly bruised.

The Tragedy of Thomas Hobbes, Wilton's, London <br>Imagine This, New London, London<br>Treasure Island, Theatre Royal, Haymarket, London

Scientific inquiry in the 17th century makes great drama, but the Holocaust makes a lousy musical

Stuart Wheeler: Don't vote for Tories without a referendum promise

Four years ago, two highly distinguished commentators – Patrick Minford, the well-known economist at Cardiff University, and Ian Milne of Global Britain and Global Vision – quite separately, and using different techniques, concluded that membership of the EU was at that time costing the people of this country about £40bn a year. That is about £3,000 a year for a family of four. And, if the Lisbon Treaty becomes law, that cost gets worse still.

Richard Ingrams' Week: We can't go on blaming the system for drug problems

It is not clear what Mr Julian Critchley, who wrote in these pages in favour of legalising all hard drugs, did when he was the director of the grandly titled UK Anti-Drug Co-ordination Unit.

Quads' joy at exam success

Four extraordinary siblings, made all the more extraordinary by the fact that they are quadruplets, were today celebrating top grade A-level results.

Lucerne Festival Strings/Fiedler Poltera, Goldsmiths' Hall, London

Raised on a dais amid the splendours of the Goldsmiths' Hall in Foster Lane, the 17 young players of the Lucerne Festival Strings were ardent and polished under their conductor, Achim Fiedler, for their appearance in the Swiss-themed City of London Festival.

Gerald Benney: Distinguished goldsmith

Gerald Benney was one of the most outstanding and influential British goldsmiths of the second half of the 20th century. During a career spanning more than 50 years, he was the first British craftsman to hold four Royal Warrants simultaneously. His work has had a major impact on the survival of domestic silver in Britain.

Richard Ingrams' Week: No wonder there is little pride and patriotism left

The former attorney general Lord Goldsmith is famous for one thing. In December 2002 he was asked by Tony Blair to adjudicate on whether the imminent invasion of Iraq would be legal under international law. Goldsmith's response was that it would be legal only in the event of a second UN resolution. But a few weeks later in March 2003 Goldsmith changed his mind and gave his approval to the imminent invasion. The reasons for the change have never been officially explained. But people are entitled to assume, despite his many protestations to the contrary, that he was leant on by Blair and meekly gave way.

Pandora: Bend a book spine like Becks

Poor Golden Danglers. England's bespectacled new football boss, Fabio Capello, has dropped David Beckham, stranding him on 99 caps. At least the former captain can bury himself in a book.

Passed/Failed: An education in the life of Judge Jules, DJ

'I did law - hence my daft name'

Hirst: I'm working on a skull worth &#163;10m

Damien Hirst is creating the world's most expensive piece of art - a life-size human skull cast in platinum and encased entirely in diamonds.

Goldsmith facing eclipse after festival flops

HARVEY GOLDSMITH, the flamboyant British promoter who gave the world Live Aid and brought Pavarotti to the parks, has been forced to put his company into receivership after suffering huge losses trying to stage a music festival during August's solar eclipse.
Latest stories from i100
SPONSORED FEATURES
Career Services

Day In a Page

A
Independent Travel
Pompeii, Capri & the Bay of Naples
Seven Cities of Italy
Burgundy, the River Rhone & Provence
Prague, Budapest and Vienna
Lake Garda
Minoan Crete and Santorini
Prices correct as of 15 May 2015
The Silk Roads that trace civilisation: Long before the West rose to power, Asian pathways were connecting peoples and places

The Silk Roads that trace civilisation

Long before the West rose to power, Asian pathways were connecting peoples and places
House of Lords: Outcry as donors, fixers and MPs caught up in expenses scandal are ennobled

The honours that shame Britain

Outcry as donors, fixers and MPs caught up in expenses scandal are ennobled
When it comes to street harassment, we need to talk about race

'When it comes to street harassment, we need to talk about race'

Why are black men living the stereotypes and why are we letting them get away with it?
International Tap Festival: Forget Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers - this dancing is improvised, spontaneous and rhythmic

International Tap Festival comes to the UK

Forget Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers - this dancing is improvised, spontaneous and rhythmic
War with Isis: Is Turkey's buffer zone in Syria a matter of self-defence – or just anti-Kurd?

Turkey's buffer zone in Syria: self-defence – or just anti-Kurd?

Ankara accused of exacerbating racial division by allowing Turkmen minority to cross the border
Doris Lessing: Acclaimed novelist was kept under MI5 observation for 18 years, newly released papers show

'A subversive brothel keeper and Communist'

Acclaimed novelist Doris Lessing was kept under MI5 observation for 18 years, newly released papers show
Big Blue Live: BBC's Springwatch offshoot swaps back gardens for California's Monterey Bay

BBC heads to the Californian coast

The Big Blue Live crew is preparing for the first of three episodes on Sunday night, filming from boats, planes and an aquarium studio
Austin Bidwell: The Victorian fraudster who shook the Bank of England with the most daring forgery the world had known

Victorian fraudster who shook the Bank of England

Conman Austin Bidwell. was a heartless cad who carried out the most daring forgery the world had known
Car hacking scandal: Security designed to stop thieves hot-wiring almost every modern motor has been cracked

Car hacking scandal

Security designed to stop thieves hot-wiring almost every modern motor has been cracked
10 best placemats

Take your seat: 10 best placemats

Protect your table and dine in style with a bold new accessory
Ashes 2015: Alastair Cook not the only one to be caught in The Oval mindwarp

Cook not the only one to be caught in The Oval mindwarp

Aussie skipper Michael Clarke was lured into believing that what we witnessed at Edgbaston and Trent Bridge would continue in London, says Kevin Garside
Can Rafael Benitez get the best out of Gareth Bale at Real Madrid?

Can Benitez get the best out of Bale?

Back at the club he watched as a boy, the pressure is on Benitez to find a winning blend from Real's multiple talents. As La Liga begins, Pete Jenson asks if it will be enough to stop Barcelona
Athletics World Championships 2015: Beijing witnesses new stage in the Jessica Ennis-Hill and Katarina Johnson-Thompson heptathlon rivalry

Beijing witnesses new stage in the Jess and Kat rivalry

The last time the two British heptathletes competed, Ennis-Hill was on the way to Olympic gold and Johnson-Thompson was just a promising teenager. But a lot has happened in the following three years
Jeremy Corbyn: Joining a shrewd operator desperate for power as he visits the North East

Jeremy Corbyn interview: A shrewd operator desperate for power

His radical anti-austerity agenda has caught the imagination of the left and politically disaffected and set a staid Labour leadership election alight
Isis executes Palmyra antiquities chief: Defender of ancient city's past was killed for protecting its future

Isis executes Palmyra antiquities chief

Robert Fisk on the defender of the ancient city's past who was killed for protecting its future