Why do Muslims keep having to explain themselves?

We hate Islamicist brutes more than any outsiders ever could

Share

On Saturday the postman delivered readers’ letters – some of them about the recent Oxford sex abuse case, others about the Muslim slaughterers of soldier Lee Rigby. Some of these letters had swastikas, others pictures of Enoch Powell,  accompanying words of such odium that it felt as if acid was burning my hands and eyes. Yes, I was distressed, but more than that, filled with fury.

I have written extensively about the Rochdale and Oxford gangs and their sick values, but it’s clearly never enough. And how dare these letter-writers link me to the Woolwich savagery? What’s it got to do with me or the millions of other blameless British Muslims? We hate Islamicist brutes more than any outsiders ever could. They ruin our futures and hopes. And at moments of high tension, the most  liberal and democratic of us fantasise about transporting them all to a remote, cold island, their own dismal caliphate  where they could preach to each other  and die.

Muslim “leaders”, imams  and those in the public eye feel under pressure to line up and denounce such perpetrators. They do as expected partly to protect Muslims from unwarranted  suspicion and revenge attacks. The response, though understandable, is misguided. This time even Richard Littlejohn, the implacable foe of migrants and minorities, admires the “mainstream Muslims” who have condemned the killers. and if Littlejohn commends these pronouncements, we must worry.

No collective

It is baleful and bigoted to assume that all of us are guilty of complicity unless  we stand up and attack the perpertrators. I don’t recall the Irish in mainland  Britain being forced into collective  denunciations following IRA bomb  attacks. Muslims do not expect white Britons to appear on Newsnight and  distance themselves from drone massacres of the innocent. So don’t ask of us what is not ever asked of others.

Furthermore, let’s stop going on about what our holy texts say or don’t say.  We must focus not on what Islam says but on what too many Muslims do. Around the world one finds disaffected Muslims who are consumed with bloodlust,  who have lost the capacity for dialogue and  compromise, who seem to have given  up on the best of human virtues – compassion, tolerance, freedom, diversity –  and who are disconnected from enlightened, earlier Muslim civilizations. Grievances have mutated into generalised brutishness.

Countless European Muslims know and oppose destructive western policies. But we understand the political contract and work within democratic conventions. The awful truth is that I could never work or write the way I do here in any Muslim country, not even after the Arab Spring. They would  silence me in days, possibly for ever.

Unfree and controlled for decades, these nations have yet to truly understand freedom and democratic thought processes. Maybe it takes a long time for this to happen. Resistance by those who do value these is quickly snuffed out. Power is tied to absolute domination and violence; obedience is the norm and a dependency on strong political and religious leadership is passed on from generation to generation. Even when dictatorships are overthrown or Muslims move to proper working democracies, this propensity to rely on strong men remains.

Devious manipulators such as Omar Bakri Muhammad, the founder of the  al-Muhajiroun pack, his successor Anjem Choudary  ( a smart, British educated  lawyer) and Saudi-backed mullahs know how easily they can ensnare young Muslims. Even the highly educated blindly submit and join the extremist creeds. Read Radical by Maajid Nawaz, co-founder of Quilliam, the think-tank which studies  radicalisation. He was a crazed, violent Islamicist who, during Mubarak’s time, ended up in an Egyptian prison where inmates were routinely tortured. He was supported by Amnesty and met prisoners who were democrats and liberals. Those experiences enabled Nawaz to free himself from  the British jihadis who had got to him.    

Noxious masculinity

The political is also personal. The  majority of fanatical followers are messed up in their heads and seem incapable of  having fulfilling relationships with women, except that is, their mothers, who usually  spoil them. Their wives and sisters are  bullied and ruthlessly dominated, while white females are considered sluts to be exploited. Sexually they take, never share. These dysfunctional males must upset those millions of Muslim men – men like Labour MP Sadiq Khan or James Caan, the Dragon’s Den entrepreneur – who are respectful of females, have open minds and a  commitment to law and order. I see a  connection between the violators and  possessors of females and religious militants hell-bent on wrecking our society. Their masculinity is noxious, confused, untamed, dangerously suggestible.

Faced with terrorism, successive governments have focused on the Quran, mosques, sometimes universities and local community henchmen. Hazel Blears when at the Home Office introduced the disastrous Prevent agenda, in effect a policy coercing Muslims to spy on each other. Very Stalinist. Didn’t work. Now Cameron wants to control the availability of Islamicist material on the web. I agree with him but can’t see how that can be done. Yet another task force will achieve little. The Tory push for more state intrusion into private life will be counterproductive and unacceptable in a free country.

Hitherto ignored is the psychological, interior world of convicted terrorists. Their states of mind should surely be explored by dispassionate experts. I once proposed to Blears just such a pilot research project  and she was majestically dismissive. New Labour preferred to send in approved imams to “cure” the prisoners, which sometimes works, but is rudimentary and based on a limited idea of human behaviour. We need to know about their upbringing in depth. These men’s self-esteem, experience of racism, and attitudes to sexuality may provide answers. Unless we know them, we can’t change them. If we don’t change them, no military, intelligence or police intervention will stop the bloody chaos. Send in the psychologists, for all our sakes.

React Now

Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

IT Services Team Leader

£35000 - £40000 Per Annum: Clearwater People Solutions Ltd: Our client, a prog...

SEN Teaching Assistant

£45 - £50 per day: Randstad Education Group: Job opportunities for SEN Teachin...

Secondary teachers required in King's Lynn

£21000 - £35000 per annum: Randstad Education Cambridge: Secondary teachers re...

Nursery Nurse

Negotiable: Randstad Education Manchester: Room Leader PositionI am currently ...

Day In a Page

Read Next
Mark Reckless, a Tory MP, has announced he is defecting to Ukip  

Douglas Carswell and Mark Reckless are heroes – and I’m lining up more of them

Nigel Farage
This Banksy mural in Clacton has been removed by the council  

Painting over the Clacton Banksy? Does nobody understand satire any more?

Rachael Jolley
Italian couples fake UK divorce scam on an ‘industrial scale’

Welcome to Maidenhead, the divorce capital of... Italy

A look at the the legal tourists who exploited our liberal dissolution rules
Tom and Jerry cartoons now carry a 'racial prejudice' warning on Amazon

Tom and Jerry cartoons now carry a 'racial prejudice' warning on Amazon

The vintage series has often been criticised for racial stereotyping
An app for the amorous: Could Good2Go end disputes about sexual consent - without being a passion-killer?

An app for the amorous

Could Good2Go end disputes about sexual consent - without being a passion-killer?
Llansanffraid is now Llansantffraid. Welsh town changes its name, but can you spot the difference?

Llansanffraid is now Llansantffraid

Welsh town changes its name, but can you spot the difference?
Charlotte Riley: At the peak of her powers

Charlotte Riley: At the peak of her powers

After a few early missteps with Chekhov, her acting career has taken her to Hollywood. Next up is a role in the BBC’s gangster drama ‘Peaky Blinders’
She's having a laugh: Britain's female comedians have never had it so good

She's having a laugh

Britain's female comedians have never had it so good, says stand-up Natalie Haynes
Sistine Chapel to ‘sing’ with new LED lights designed to bring Michelangelo’s masterpiece out of the shadows

Let there be light

Sistine Chapel to ‘sing’ with new LEDs designed to bring Michelangelo’s masterpiece out of the shadows
Great British Bake Off, semi-final, review: Richard remains the baker to beat

Tensions rise in Bake Off's pastry week

Richard remains the baker to beat as Chetna begins to flake
Paris Fashion Week, spring/summer 2015: Time travel fashion at Louis Vuitton in Paris

A look to the future

It's time travel fashion at Louis Vuitton in Paris
The 10 best bedspreads

The 10 best bedspreads

Before you up the tog count on your duvet, add an extra layer and a room-changing piece to your bed this autumn
Arsenal vs Galatasaray: Five things we learnt from the Emirates

Arsenal vs Galatasaray

Five things we learnt from the Gunners' Champions League victory at the Emirates
Stuart Lancaster’s long-term deal makes sense – a rarity for a decision taken by the RFU

Lancaster’s long-term deal makes sense – a rarity for a decision taken by the RFU

This deal gives England a head-start to prepare for 2019 World Cup, says Chris Hewett
Ebola outbreak: The children orphaned by the virus – then rejected by surviving relatives over fear of infection

The children orphaned by Ebola...

... then rejected by surviving relatives over fear of infection
Pride: Are censors pandering to homophobia?

Are censors pandering to homophobia?

US film censors have ruled 'Pride' unfit for under-16s, though it contains no sex or violence
The magic of roundabouts

Lords of the rings

Just who are the Roundabout Appreciation Society?