Stonehenge lays out the welcome mat

Tortuous battle to agree design for visitor centre is finally resolved

Stonehenge, Britain's most mysteriously resonant World Heritage Site, is finally going to get a visitor centre fit for the 21st century.

The fight to create it has been tortuous, but from the wreckage of the £0.5bn plans finally dumped in 2007 comes something that will settle, feather-light, in a shallow, grassy swale at Airman's Corner, a mile and a half west of the neolithic stones near Amesbury, Wiltshire.

The new visitor centre's thin undulating roof, held up with slim and occasionally crooked columns, recalls the current temporary Serpentine Pavilion in London. The scheme, designed by Denton Corker Marshall, will cost £26m – one-twentieth of the original project by the same architects. "Sir Philip Green probably spent more than that on his son's bar mitzvah," commented one leading British architect.

The centre will not be visible from the stones, and an existing line of mature beech trees will screen a new coach park from view. By siting functions such as catering and offices next to the coach park, two pavilions beneath the centre's canopy can be used solely for exhibitions, retail and education.

The design was developed by Barrie Marshall and Stephen Quinlan, who won't mind if the building is forgettable. "Our proposal seeks not to compromise the solidity and timelessness of the stones," Mr Quinlan told The Independent. "If a visitor can remember their visit to the stones but can't remember the visitor centre they passed through, we will be happy.

"We've tried to satisfy the brief with a design which is universally accessible, environmentally sensitive, and at the same time appears almost transitory in nature."

The design of the building steers a fine – if not literally wavering – line between permanence and transience. A source said: "The new visitor centre is meant to last several years until a permanent one can be built, but it's bound to become permanent because we don't, as a country, always commit enough money to projects like this."

The scheme will restore Stonehenge's immediate natural surroundings by upgrading the Longbarrow roundabout, creating a new one north of it at the current junction of the A360 and A344 – and then restoring most of the latter to open land as it passes north of the stones. The destruction of the existing, rather grungy visitor centre will be heartily cheered by anyone with any aesthetic or environmental sensitivity; as will the fact that the new structure will draw its water from an aquifer beneath it, generate internal warmth using a ground heat-source pump, be approached on natural rather than paved paths, and transport non-walkers to the megaliths in a Tellytubby-ish "trundler" train similar to that used at Kew Gardens.

There remains a nominal threat that the new design will be called in for a public inquiry by the Government. Bearing in mind the costly shambles created by previous implacable disagreements between the project's key players, this seems inconceivable.

Indeed, a carefully brokered peace seems to have broken out: the South West Regional Development Agency, the National Trust, and Natural England have all endorsed the scheme in principle. Wiltshire County Council will now filter the scheme through a formal public consultation process, the final act in a cultural saga that will bear its architectural fruit just in time to welcome a surge in visitor numbers to Stonehenge during the 2012 Olympics.

Arts and Entertainment
By Seuss! ‘What Pet Shall I Get?’ hits the bookshops this week
Books
Arts and Entertainment
The mushroom cloud over Hiroshima after Enola Gray and her crew dropped the bomb
TV review
Arts and Entertainment
Elliott outside his stationery store that houses a Post Office
TV review
Arts and Entertainment
Rebecca Ferguson, Tom Cruise in Mission Impossible Rogue Nation

Film review Tom Cruise, 50, is still like a puppy in this relentless action soap opera

Arts and Entertainment
Rachel McAdams in True Detective season 2

TV review
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Arts and Entertainment

ebooksNow available in paperback
Arts and Entertainment

ebooks
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
SPONSORED FEATURES

ES Rentals

    Independent Dating
    and  

    By clicking 'Search' you
    are agreeing to our
    Terms of Use.

    Mullah Omar, creator of the Taliban, is dead... for the fourth time

    Mullah Omar, creator of the Taliban, is dead... again

    I was once told that intelligence services declare their enemies dead to provoke them into popping up their heads and revealing their location, says Robert Fisk
    Margaret Attwood on climate change: 'Time is running out for our fragile, Goldilocks planet'

    Margaret Attwood on climate change

    The author looks back on what she wrote about oil in 2009, and reflects on how the conversation has changed in a mere six years
    New Dr Seuss manuscript discovered: What Pet Should I Get? goes on sale this week

    New Dr Seuss manuscript discovered

    What Pet Should I Get? goes on sale this week
    Oculus Rift and the lonely cartoon hedgehog who could become the first ever virtual reality movie star

    The cartoon hedgehog leading the way into a whole new reality

    Virtual reality is the 'next chapter' of entertainment. Tim Walker gives it a try
    Ants have unique ability to switch between individual and collective action, says study

    Secrets of ants' teamwork revealed

    The insects have an almost unique ability to switch between individual and collective action
    Donovan interview: The singer is releasing a greatest hits album to mark his 50th year in folk

    Donovan marks his 50th year in folk

    The singer tells Nick Duerden about receiving death threats, why the world is 'mentally ill', and how he can write a song about anything, from ecology to crumpets
    Let's Race simulator: Ultra-realistic technology recreates thrill of the Formula One circuit

    Simulator recreates thrill of F1 circuit

    Rory Buckeridge gets behind the wheel and explains how it works
    Twitter accused of 'Facebookisation' over plans to overhaul reverse-chronological timeline

    Twitter accused of 'Facebookisation'

    Facebook exasperates its users by deciding which posts they can and can’t see. So why has Twitter announced plans to do the same?
    Jane Birkin asks Hermès to rename bag - but what else could the fashion house call it?

    Jane Birkin asks Hermès to rename bag

    The star was shocked by a Peta investigation into the exotic skins trade
    10 best waterproof mascaras

    Whatever the weather: 10 best waterproof mascaras

    We found lash-enhancing beauties that won’t budge no matter what you throw at them
    Diego Costa biography: Chelsea striker's route to the top - from those who shared his journey

    Diego Costa: I go to war. You come with me...

    Chelsea's rampaging striker had to fight his way from a poor city in Brazil to life at the top of the Premier League. A new book speaks to those who shared his journey
    Ashes 2015: England show the mettle to strike back hard in third Test

    England show the mettle to strike back hard in third Test

    The biggest problem facing them in Birmingham was the recovery of the zeitgeist that drained so quickly under the weight of Australian runs at Lord's, says Kevin Garside
    Women's Open 2015: Charley Hull - 'I know I'm a good golfer but I'm also just a person'

    Charley Hull: 'I know I'm a good golfer but I'm also just a person'

    British teen keeps her feet on ground ahead of Women's Open
    Turkey's conflict with Kurdish guerrillas in Iraq can benefit Isis in Syria

    Turkey's conflict with Kurdish guerrillas in Iraq can benefit Isis in Syria

    Turkish President Erdogan could benefit politically from the targeting of the PKK, says Patrick Cockburn
    Yvette Cooper: Our choice is years of Tory rule under Jeremy Corbyn or a return to a Labour government

    Our choice is years of Tory rule under Corbyn or a return to a Labour government

    Yvette Cooper urged Labour members to 'get serious' about the next general election rather than become 'a protest movement'