The ten best autumn cookbooks

Supergrub by Malcolm Gluck and Silvena Rowe

Cookbooks without photographs are a rarity these days, but this mouth-watering compilation really doesn't need them. It's presented as a series of inexpensive dinner-party menus with wine recommendations, and, to date, I've simply cherry-picked the dishes that appeal to me. We'll certainly be making the wonderful walnutty take on aubergine caviar again.

Collins, £7.99

Fish Etc by Mark Hix

My husband is a great fan of Mark Hix and a great fan of me if I cook Mark's fish pie from the "Comfort Fish" chapter of this inspiring book. It takes in all manner of seafood, including crustacea, preserved fish and fish offal, and features a wide range of international flavours, from Thailand to Tipperary.

Quadrille, £18.99

Sue Lawrence's Book of Baking by Sue Lawrence

Chilly autumn afternoons are the time you want to return from a trek on the common to find a tray of freshly baked goodies. And when they're succulent banana flapjacks - one of the excellent recipes in Twiglet-thin Sue Lawrence's healthy baking chapter - you won't be undoing the benefits of that walk either.

Headline, £20

Food and Travels: Asia by Alastair Hendy

The author risks flea-ridden banana boats in Burma so you don't have to. Hendy is a superlative photographer, as well as food stylist, and this gritty yet beautiful book recording his expeditions through Asia makes you wish you were travelling alongside him (and sometimes rather pleased that you're not).

Mitchell Beazley, £25

Sausage and Mash by Fiona Beckett

One of the best curries I've ever had was a cured sausage and lentil dish from Goa, so this clever collection of local and international recipes resonates with me. Covering everything from sausages with chunky chips to Chinese-style sausages with stir-fried greens, Fiona's book is both fun and sensible and will make a great present, especially for the chaps.

Absolute, £17.50

Trattoria by Ursula Ferrigno

Francesca Yorke's sumptuous photography transports this basic Italian cookbook from kitchen to armchair. A prudent purchase if you don't have many books on the food of Italy, Trattoria is full of comfortingly familiar rustic and traditional dishes. The specials board includes baked celery with pancetta, and chocolate cake "Santini", made with prunes and Grand Marnier.

Mitchell Beazley, £20

Seasonal Food by Paul Waddington

With pumpkins, parsnips, celeriac and quinces available, the approach of October is perhaps not as depressing as shorter days and clocks going back may suggest; certainly not if you enjoy cooking. If you want to feel really good about the coming winter, read this beautifully photographed celebration of local, sustainable, agriculture, while sitting next to a light-box for 30 minutes every day.

Eden Project Books/Transworld, £10.99

Harumi's Japanese Cooking by Harumi Kurihara

The words "tempting" and "tofu" can rarely be used in the same sentence. But in Harumi Kurihara's hands, they go together perfectly - and she throws in "simple" for good measure. Most of the recipes in her stylish book have only four or five steps, and she makes great use of the microwave, so if you're intrigued by the food of Japan but fear it's too complicated, this is ideal.

Conran Octopus, £20

Cooking Weeds by Vivien Weise

One of God's great ironies is that we can live well on grass and weeds. Indeed, nettle ravioli and dandelion salads are increasingly seen on the menus of fashionable restaurants. This quirky book by a German gardening expert and cooking teacher has plenty of other, interesting ways to use them, too. Comfrey hamburger, anyone?

Prospect, £9.99

The Food of Spain and Portugal by Elisabeth Luard

A new book from Elisabeth Luard is something to look forward to. The author of European Peasant Cookery and Saffron and Sunshine has been investigating rustic Mediterranean cuisines for years and is an engaging writer. Although premium-priced, this reference book includes more than 150 recipes as well as luscious, lavish photography and artwork.

Kyle Cathie, £25

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