FILM / Disney's new hit: very pulpable

IT'S NOT often that a voice steals a cartoon. Donald Duck had his squawk and Yogi Bear his deep, dumb burr, but both toed the drawing's line. Mickey Mouse was no conversationalist, and Tom and Jerry, until their recent disastrous feature film, spoke in blows. In Aladdin (U), Robin Williams changes all that, matching his hair-trigger vocal impressions to the protean form of the Genie of the Lamp. With more metamorphoses than Ovid, he riffs through film and TV voices - De Niro, Schwarzenegger, Phil Donahue - while his blubbery blue body races to catch up. It's fun - though the catchphrases hit the mark more often than the mimicry - but also a little wearing. The Genie, like the film, is too eager to please.

Distortion, not contortion, is the screenplay's trick. It takes the oriental tale and turns it into an American dream of rags to riches, and all-conquering love. Gone is the sorcerer and his 'new lamps for old' ruse. Here, instead, is a stage-villain Vizier standing in the way of scape- grace Aladdin's match with Princess Jasmine. Gone is the skulduggery by which Aladdin won the lamp. There's now a line about it going to 'one whose rags hide a heart that is pure . . .' - which sounds like a positive discrimination clause. The shady complexity of the original has been swapped for a tale of black and white - or, judging by the skin colours of villains and virtuous, black and lighter.

You can also tell good from bad by their large eyes - Jasmine's are each as wide as her waist - and their teeth. The heroes don't have individual teeth, just a dazzling milky slash, which fits their toothless roles. The devil has the best toons: the evil Vizier, with his mean, stick-like frame and thick black eyebrows permanently arched in disdain; and on his shoulder, a wise- cracking parrot who looks more like a scarecrow.

The animation is everything you'd expect from Disney and modern computers. They will show you magic in a handful of dust - the lamp sprinkles gold powder, which settles as stars across the inky sky. A cartoon world has never looked so three-dimensional: when Aladdin and Jasmine sit overlooking the city, they seem perched on a precipice, houses spread beneath, palace minarets towering afar. The detail is meticulous, skin colour changing with the light. But still the characters' movements are a flickery blur. Like the songs, which scuttle by, these twitchy images cater to a tiny attention span. Details are plucked out at speed so you never have a sense of the whole world. Whereas Disney's classics relaxed as well as seduced, Aladdin flurries to the market place, seeking to satisfy all tastes. Were it not already the most successful American cartoon ever, I'd say they'd got the formula wrong.

To move from Aladdin to Satyajit Ray's last film, The Stranger (U), is to leap from frenetic commerce to unhurried artistry, craven superficiality to knotty profundity. As Ray's career went on, his style simplified and his vision deepened. The Stranger, shot in an almost square frame, largely takes place in one Calcutta living room. The scenes are long and, by Western standards, wordy, but they seem to glide into one another. Ray's eye for elegant but natural compositions, and the colour of India, prevent the film grinding into austerity. As the film begins to unravel its ideas about tradition and identity, the room seems to open out and reveal its secrets.

It starts with a letter - formal, graceful, deferential - which Anila Bose (Mamata Shankar) reads to her husband, Sudhindra (Deepankar Dey). It purports to be from her great uncle, requesting the traditional right of hospitality - which in the old days extended even to strangers - during a stay in the city. The couple's wary, agonised reaction reveals a wealth of detail about their lives, and their dilemma seems symptomatic of their, and many other Indians', divided lives. Their hold on their traditions is loosened by the pull of the West. Ray's supple screenplay makes the point even in the way people speak, breaking from Bengali into English words and phrases.

When the self-proclaimed uncle Manomohan (Utpal Dutt) arrives, he's like a figure from Ibsen (Ray filmed a version of An Enemy of the People in 1989), or J B Priestley's inspector calling - an uncompromising truth-teller who shakes up the lives around him with his wisdom. When Sudhindra makes to touch his feet in respect, Manomohan draws away: 'When your mind is free of doubt, then you can touch my feet.' Anila is less sceptical and more welcoming. She's typical of Ray's women characters, who tend to be more rounded than the men - less tainted by the British, having had little contact with them. In her saree and with her red spot on her forehead, she is more intuitive and less Westernised than her husband, who wears a pin-stripe suit. When they discuss throwing out the guest, he talks of 'showing him the door', while she uses a more domestic phrase: 'I'll whisk him away with the broom.'

As the uncle, Utpal Dutt, with his sad, bloodshot eyes, has a wonderful weary dignity. He has travelled in the West and Africa, as an anthropologist, but his knowledge of civilisation has sent him back to basics - he compares a cave drawing to a Leonardo. In the rush to progress, he seems to be saying, we've trampled over tradition. Ray is arguing for a gentler, slower pace of life, as well as film-making. The uncle, who is cross-examined on his identity by the couple's Rubik Cube- twirling lawyer friend, argues that getting to know a person takes time.

That was also true of Ray's films, which were exquisite miniatures. At times they were accused of being too rarefied, detached from the bustle and turmoil of the society around them - humanism makes nothing happen, seemed to be the charge. But The Stranger shows how the personal can examine the universal, how Ray's films were about, in the title of one of their greatest, The Home and the World. And despite a Rayishly benign ending, The Stranger feels like a despairing lament for a society vanishing before its people's indifferent eyes.

Mel Gibson makes his directorial debut with The Man Without a Face (U), the story of a deformed ex-teacher (Gibson) who lives as an outcast until he starts to tutor a small boy from a troubled family. It's a limp hybrid of Edward Scissorhands and Dead Poets Society. Though Mel's supposed to have been involved in some shady business with a former pupil, the film is blatantly rigged in his favour. It's made clear that he's a good egg - even if his face looks like a scrambled one. (In fact, only half of it is patchworked in scars - fans can feast on the perfect left profile.) The Man Without a Face might be Mel, the director, so characterless is his work behind the camera. It feels as if he has been too indulgent to his fellow actors, never goading anyone into a performance.

If you must see a comedy this week, go to I Married an Axe Murderer (15), in which Mike Myers (of Wayne's World fame) plays Charlie, a comic performance poet, who gets into the eponymous marital pickle. There are more laughs in Myers's portrayal of Charlie's boozy father, a cantankerous Scottish conspiracy theorist. And Brenda Fricker gives a winning cameo as his blowzy wife. Follow their example in tanking up on beer, and it might be a riot.

No amount of alcohol could raise a laugh out of The Concierge (PG), in which Michael J Fox plays a bell-boy with big ambitions. If you like spending aimless hours in hotel lobbies, it's for you.

Arts and Entertainment
Victoria Wood, Kayvan Novak, Alexa Chung, Chris Moyles
tvReview: No soggy bottoms, but plenty of other baking disasters on The Great Comic Relief Bake Off
Arts and Entertainment
80s trailblazer: comedian Tracey Ullman
tv
Arts and Entertainment
Stephen Tompkinson is back as DCI Banks
tvReview: Episode one of the new series played it safe, but at least this drama has a winning formula
Arts and Entertainment
TV
News
Graham Norton said Irish broadcaster RTE’s decision to settle was ‘moronic’
TV
Arts and Entertainment
Attenborough with the primates
tv
Arts and Entertainment
Former Communards frontman Jimmy Somerville
music
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Arts and Entertainment

ebooksNow available in paperback
Arts and Entertainment

ebooks
Arts and Entertainment
Secrets of JK Rowling's Harry Potter workings have been revealed in a new bibliography
arts + ents
Arts and Entertainment
Fearne Cotton is leaving Radio 1 after a decade
radio The popular DJ is leaving for 'family and new adventures'
Arts and Entertainment
arts + ents
Arts and Entertainment
Public Service Broadcasting are going it alone
music
Arts and Entertainment
Eddie Redmayne as transgender artist Lili Elbe in The Danish Girl
filmFirst look at Oscar winner as transgender artist
Arts and Entertainment
Season three of 'House of Cards' will be returning later this month
TV reviewHouse of Cards returns to Netflix
Arts and Entertainment
Harrison Ford will play Rick Deckard once again for the Blade Runner sequel
film review
Arts and Entertainment
The modern Thunderbirds: L-R, Scott, Virgil, Alan, Gordon and John in front of their home, the exotic Tracy Island
TV
Arts and Entertainment
Natural beauty: Aidan Turner stars in the new series of Poldark
TV
Arts and Entertainment
Taylor Swift won Best International Solo Female (Getty)

Brits 2015
Arts and Entertainment
Shining star: Maika Monroe, with Jake Weary, in ‘It Follows’
film review
Arts and Entertainment

Brits 2015
Arts and Entertainment
Paloma Faith arrives at the Brit Awards (Getty)

Brits 2015
Arts and Entertainment
Anne Boleyn's beheading in BBC Two's Wolf Hall

TV review
Arts and Entertainment
Follow every rainbow: Julie Andrews in 'The Sound of Music'
film Elizabeth Von Trapp reveals why the musical is so timeless
Arts and Entertainment
Bytes, camera, action: Leehom Wang in ‘Blackhat’
film
Arts and Entertainment
The Libertines will headline this year's festival
music
Arts and Entertainment
Richard Dean Anderson in the original TV series, which ran for seven seasons from 1985-1992
tv
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

ES Rentals

    Independent Dating
    and  

    By clicking 'Search' you
    are agreeing to our
    Terms of Use.

    War with Isis: Iraq's government fights to win back Tikrit from militants - but then what?

    Baghdad fights to win back Tikrit from Isis – but then what?

    Patrick Cockburn reports from Kirkuk on a conflict which sectarianism has made intractable
    Living with Alzheimer's: What is it really like to be diagnosed with early-onset dementia?

    What is it like to live with Alzheimer's?

    Depicting early-onset Alzheimer's, the film 'Still Alice' had a profound effect on Joy Watson, who lives with the illness. She tells Kate Hilpern how she's coped with the diagnosis
    The Internet of Things: Meet the British salesman who gave real-world items a virtual life

    Setting in motion the Internet of Things

    British salesman Kevin Ashton gave real-world items a virtual life
    Election 2015: Latest polling reveals Tories and Labour on course to win the same number of seats - with the SNP holding the balance of power

    Election 2015: A dead heat between Mr Bean and Dick Dastardly!

    Lord Ashcroft reveals latest polling – and which character voters associate with each leader
    Audiences queue up for 'true stories told live' as cult competition The Moth goes global

    Cult competition The Moth goes global

    The non-profit 'slam storytelling' competition was founded in 1997 by the novelist George Dawes Green and has seen Malcolm Gladwell, Salman Rushdie and Molly Ringwald all take their turn at the mic
    Pakistani women come out fighting: A hard-hitting play focuses on female Muslim boxers

    Pakistani women come out fighting

    Hard-hitting new play 'No Guts, No Heart, No Glory' focuses on female Muslim boxers
    Leonora Carrington transcended her stolid background to become an avant garde star

    Surreal deal: Leonora Carrington

    The artist transcended her stolid background to become an avant garde star
    LGBT History Month: Pupils discuss topics from Sappho to same-sex marriage

    Education: LGBT History Month

    Pupils have been discussing topics from Sappho to same-sex marriage
    11 best gel eyeliners

    Go bold this season: 11 best gel eyeliners

    Use an ink pot eyeliner to go bold on the eyes with this season's feline flicked winged liner
    Cricket World Cup 2015: Tournament runs riot to make the event more hit than miss...

    Cricket World Cup runs riot to make the event more hit than miss...

    The tournament has reached its halfway mark and scores of 300 and amazing catches abound. One thing never changes, though – everyone loves beating England
    Katarina Johnson-Thompson: Heptathlete ready to jump at first major title

    Katarina Johnson-Thompson: Ready to jump at first major title

    After her 2014 was ruined by injury, 21-year-old Briton is leading pentathlete going into this week’s European Indoors. Now she intends to turn form into gold
    Syrian conflict is the world's first 'climate change war', say scientists, but it won't be the last one

    Climate change key in Syrian conflict

    And it will trigger more war in future
    How I outwitted the Gestapo

    How I outwitted the Gestapo

    My life as a Jew in wartime Berlin
    The nation's favourite animal revealed

    The nation's favourite animal revealed

    Women like cuddly creatures whilst men like creepy-crawlies
    Is this the way to get young people to vote?

    Getting young people to vote

    From #VOTESELFISH to Bite the Ballot