Dawn Of The Planet Of The Apes, review: Andy Serkis is an extraordinarily expressive Caesar

3.00

Fans can expect full blooded action sequences from Matt Reeves' blockbuster

"Caesar loves humans more than apes" is the charge levelled at the simian hero of Matt Reeves' new blockbuster.

Caesar’s accuser is his Iago-like lieutenant Koba, who utterly detests humankind but isn’t especially fond of chimps and orang-utans either. Koba behaves with a level of violence and duplicity that even the humans can't quite match. He also gets many of the film’s best lines.

One of the fascinations of the film, and ultimately one of its biggest frustrations, is how close the apes are to the humans. Some of them speak in monosyllabic English, a bit like Apaches in old westerns, uttering gnomic lines like “ apes do no want war.”

They communicate elegantly in sign language (translated on screen by subtitles.) “They want what we want…to survive,” the well-meaning Malcolm (Jason Clarke) says of them.

 

 

The new film may lack the sentimentality of its predecessor (with its scenes of James Franco’s scientist doting on Caesar when he was a cuddly young chimp) but it anthropomorphises the apes even more. They ride horses. The shoot guns. They drink alcohol. They love their partners. They cry. They are nostalgic about their childhood. They’re so like the humans that there hardly seems any point in them being apes.

At the end of the last film, the apes escaped captivity, rampaged along the Golden Gate Bridge and headed up into the hills. Now, a few years on, they seem to be thriving in an Edenic wilderness.

The humans, by contrast, are in a wretched state. A virus (wrongly blamed on the apes) has wiped out vast swathes of the population. San Francisco has a post-apocalyptic look. Here, human survivors are eking out an existence, running short on food and electricity under the command of their leader Dreyfuss (Gary Oldman in bossy, heroic Commissioner Gordon mode).

There is a tremendous sequence early on in which the apes kill a bear. In this scene, at least, the feral quality of the apes is not in question. Nor is their capacity for violence.

Even better is the scene in which, after many years of no contact, they first re-encounter humans (who are on an expedition into the wilds to try to repair an old dam.) As hundreds come swooping down out of the damp, mist-shrouded woods to confront Malcolm and the other humans, the gorilla army make a truly intimidating sight.

Caesar (Andy Serkis) is their leader. Given the constraints under which he must have been working, being filmed with motion capture technology and under layers of heavy make-up, Serkis’ performance is extraordinarily expressive. He has an imposing gait. We know he is boss by the slow and deliberate way he moves. Serkis brings a gravitas and pathos to his role. He also roars and moves with menace in the fight scenes.

It’s a rounded, deeply layered performance, a world away from the pantomime-style kitsch of the ape characters in Tim Burton’s 2001 film or in earlier ape sagas in which Roddy McDowall “chimped” up. Meanwhile, Toby Kebbell shows snarling malevolence as Koba.

Reeves’ production designers take an obvious delight in portraying San Francisco in the depths of decay. Weeds are sprouting up through the sidewalks. There is graffiti everywhere. The skyscrapers are uninhabited (although their girders and ledges make an excellent backdrop for the apes to swing and fight from.). A very modern city has been forced to function along medieval lines. There is one haunting scene in an abandoned garage in which the electricity comes back on and we suddenly hear The Band’s classic song The Weight blaring out from a jukebox.

The scenes in the forest are equally well detailed. For the humans who venture out here, the natural world is damp, misty and very threatening.

Jason Clarke stars as Malcolm in Dawn of the Planet of the Apes as he tries to reconcile the warring apes and humans Jason Clarke stars as Malcolm in Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

What Dawn Of The Planet Of The Apes is lacking is any obvious subtext. Most previous Ape movies have had a strong allegorical undertow. They were probing away at racial and political tensions in late 60s and early 70s US society, a period when the threat of nuclear destruction was also taken very seriously.

Here, it is very hard to work out what Reeves is driving at. At one stage, we see a faded American flag featured prominently as the humans sink to their lowest ebb. The once mighty nation can no longer defend itself. The surviving citizens of San Francisco are learning what it is like to live in a state of siege and captivity. They are in thrall to Koba, who suffered in captivity and is now as much a scourge of the humans as the most ruthless terrorist leader.

If the filmmakers are making some comment on the decline of American empire, they are doing so only in passing. One guesses Reeves’ real concern is to deliver the thrills expected in a summer franchise movie.

The plotting here is predictable and, at times, even melodramatic. As family complications abound and Koba seeks to usurp Caesar, it’s as if we are watching a simian soap opera minus the teabags. There are few surprises in how any of the characters, ape or human, behave or in what becomes of them. What the film does offer is full blooded action sequences. We see the apes charging humans on horseback, blowing up their defences and even turning their own tanks against them. There are terrifying scenes of people scurrying for safety as the invaders round them up.

In terms of ideas, all Reeves really tells us is that simian and human nature are two sides of the same coin. There are good apes and bad humans - and vice versa. That won’t ever change. After all, if ever they managed to live together without violence, the whole point of the franchise would be lost.

Arts and Entertainment
Thomas carried Lady Edith over the flames in her bedroom in Downton Abbey series five

TV
Arts and Entertainment

music
Arts and Entertainment
Ben Affleck as Nick Dunne, seated next to a picture of his missing wife Amy, played by Rosamund Pike

film
Arts and Entertainment
Rachel, Chandler and Ross try to get Ross's sofa up the stairs in the famous 'Pivot!' scene

Friends 20th anniversary
Arts and Entertainment
Lena Dunham

books
PROMOTED VIDEO
Arts and Entertainment
A bit rich: Maggie Smith in Downton Abbey

There’s revolution in the air, but one lady’s not for turning

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Chloe-Jasmine Whicello impressed the judges and the audience at Wembley Arena with a sultry performance
TVReview: Who'd have known Simon was such a Roger Rabbit fan?
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Arts and Entertainment
Nick Frost will star in the Doctor Who 2014 Christmas special

TV
Arts and Entertainment
A spell in the sun: Emma Stone and Colin Firth star in ‘Magic in the Moonlight’
filmReview: Magic In The Moonlight
Arts and Entertainment
Friends is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year
TV
Arts and Entertainment
Ben Whishaw is replacing Colin Firth as the voice of Paddington Bear

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Actor and director Zach Braff

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Maisie Williams plays 'bad ass' Arya Stark in Game of Thrones

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Liam Neeson said he wouldn't

TV
Arts and Entertainment

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Meera Syal was a member of the team that created Goodness Gracious Me

TV
Arts and Entertainment
The former Doctor Who actor is to play a vicar is search of a wife

film
Arts and Entertainment

music
Arts and Entertainment
Pointless host Alexander Armstrong will voice Danger Mouse on CBBC

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Pharrell dismissed the controversy surrounding

music
Arts and Entertainment
Jack Huston is the new Ben-Hur

film
Arts and Entertainment

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Cara Delevingne modelling

film
Arts and Entertainment
Emma Thompson and Bryn Terfel are bringing Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street to the London Coliseum

theatre
Arts and Entertainment
Sheridan Smith as Cilla Black

TV
Arts and Entertainment
Robin Thicke's video for 'Blurred Lines' has been criticised for condoning rape

Robin Thicke admits he didn't write 'Blurred Lines'

music
Arts and Entertainment
While many films were released, few managed to match the success of James Bond blockbuster 'Skyfall'

film
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

ES Rentals

    Independent Dating
    and  

    By clicking 'Search' you
    are agreeing to our
    Terms of Use.

    Secret politics of the weekly shop

    The politics of the weekly shop

    New app reveals political leanings of food companies
    Beam me up, Scottie!

    Beam me up, Scottie!

    Celebrity Trekkies from Alex Salmond to Barack Obama
    Beware Wet Paint: The ICA's latest ambitious exhibition

    Beware Wet Paint

    The ICA's latest ambitious exhibition
    Pink Floyd have produced some of rock's greatest ever album covers

    Pink Floyd have produced some of rock's greatest ever album covers

    Can 'The Endless River' carry on the tradition?
    Sanctuary for the suicidal

    Sanctuary for the suicidal

    One mother's story of how London charity Maytree helped her son with his depression
    A roller-coaster tale from the 'voice of a generation'

    Not That Kind of Girl:

    A roller-coaster tale from 'voice of a generation' Lena Dunham
    London is not bedlam or a cradle of vice. In fact it, as much as anywhere, deserves independence

    London is not bedlam or a cradle of vice

    In fact it, as much as anywhere, deserves independence
    Vivienne Westwood 'didn’t want' relationship with Malcolm McLaren

    Vivienne Westwood 'didn’t want' relationship with McLaren

    Designer 'felt pressured' into going out with Sex Pistols manager
    Jourdan Dunn: Model mother

    Model mother

    Jordan Dunn became one of the best-paid models in the world
    Apple still coolest brand – despite U2 PR disaster

    Apple still the coolest brand

    Despite PR disaster of free U2 album
    Scottish referendum: The Yes vote was the love that dared speak its name, but it was not to be

    Despite the result, this is the end of the status quo

    Boyd Tonkin on the fall-out from the Scottish referendum
    Manolo Blahnik: The high priest of heels talks flats, Englishness, and why he loves Mary Beard

    Manolo Blahnik: Flats, Englishness, and Mary Beard

    The shoe designer who has been dubbed 'the patron saint of the stiletto'
    The Beatles biographer reveals exclusive original manuscripts of some of the best pop songs ever written

    Scrambled eggs and LSD

    Behind The Beatles' lyrics - thanks to Hunter Davis's original manuscript copies
    'Normcore' fashion: Blending in is the new standing out in latest catwalk non-trend

    'Normcore': Blending in is the new standing out

    Just when fashion was in grave danger of running out of trends, it only went and invented the non-trend. Rebecca Gonsalves investigates
    Dance’s new leading ladies fight back: How female vocalists are now writing their own hits

    New leading ladies of dance fight back

    How female vocalists are now writing their own hits