A Curious night out with the Doctor

A fundraising sequel to 'The Curious Incident of the Dog' features a galaxy of British stars

What could possibly be more curious than a dead dog, skewered by a garden fork? How about the peculiar case of the Bond boffin Q trying to stop Sherlock Holmes's arch enemy Moriarty from wiping out culture as we know it while our very own monarch looks on from the sidelines?

All this and more will happen tomorrow night in a remarkable sequel to a hit West End show that unites some of Britain's biggest stars – and their dramatic alter egos – from Doctor Who's Matt Smith to Helen Mirren's Olivier-winning role as Queen Elizabeth in Peter Morgan's The Audience.

The actors, including Andrew Scott as Moriarty, Ben Whishaw as Q, and Jude Law as an unlikely supply teacher, will take to the stage in a follow-up to The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, the award-winning play based on Mark Haddon's novel.

Haddon and Simon Stephens, the playwright who adapted the best-selling book for the stage, have written the playful sequel for a fundraising gala at the Apollo Theatre tomorrow in aid of the charities Ambitious about Autism and The National Autistic Society.

Stephens said: "It is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see all those people in the same story.... I'm sure a lot of people have fantasised about what would happen if the Doctor did battle with Moriarty."

In The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, Christopher Boone, a 15-year-old boy with Asperger's syndrome, a form of autism, seeks to solve the mystery of who murdered his neighbour's dog. He has a talent for maths but finds metaphors confusing.

In the new story, Boone (played by Luke Treadaway, the star of the National Theatre production that scooped seven gongs at this year's Oliviers) is playing Tetris on his Game Boy when a message on his screen from Doctor Who pops up. The Time Lord tells him that the dreaded Moriarty has created a computer virus which, if it goes viral, will destroy the human capacity to understand metaphor, and therefore culture such as poetry and art will be weakened.

In his mission to stop Moriarty spreading this Metaphor Virus, Boone goes to ask the Queen if he can enlist Q's expertise. He also gets help from Jude Law, who plays a special supply teacher who steps in when his usual teacher, Siobhan, played by Niamh Cusack in both the West End production and tomorrow's show, goes away for teacher training.

The play features live performances from Law, Treadaway and Cusack, and filmed performances from Smith, Scott, Whishaw and Mirren. "It is quite epic in its ambition but it's a beautiful little story," said Treadaway.

He is co-producing the gala, A Curious Night at the Theatre, which is being hosted by The Great British Bake Off presenter Mel Giedroyc and will also feature stand-up comedy from Simon Amstell, music from groups including Bat for Lashes and an auction. The Bond producer Barbara Broccoli, who approved the inclusion of Q, will be among the audience.

The play is likely to be one of Smith's last appearances as Doctor Who, as his character will regenerate in a TV Christmas special. Scott's Moriarty is presumed dead.

PROMOTED VIDEO
Arts and Entertainment
Original Netflix series such as Orange Is The New Black are to benefit from a 'substantial' increase in investment

TV
Arts and Entertainment
'Eminem's recovery from substance abuse has made him a more potent performer, with physical charisma and energy he never had before'
musicReview: Wembley Stadium ***
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent
Travel Shop
the manor
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on city breaks Find out more
santorini
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on chic beach resorts Find out more
sardina foodie
Up to 70% off luxury travel
on country retreats Find out more
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?

ES Rentals

    Independent Dating
    and  

    By clicking 'Search' you
    are agreeing to our
    Terms of Use.

    Super Mario crushes the Messi dream as Germany win the 2014 World Cup in Brazil

    Super Mario crushes the Messi dream

    Germany win the 2014 World Cup in Brazil
    Saharan remains may be evidence of the first race war, 13,000 years ago

    The first race war, 13,000 years ago?

    Saharan remains may be evidence of oldest large-scale armed conflict
    Scientists find early warning system for Alzheimer’s

    Scientists find early warning system for Alzheimer’s

    Researchers hope eye tests can spot ‘biomarkers’ of the disease
    Sex, controversy and schoolgirl schtick

    Meet Japan's AKB48

    Pop, sex and schoolgirl schtick make for controversial success
    In pictures: Breathtaking results of this weekend's 'supermoon'

    Weekend's 'supermoon' in pictures

    The moon appeared bigger and brighter at the weekend
    Iraq crisis: How Saudi Arabia helped Isis take over the north of the country

    How Saudi Arabia helped Isis take over northern Iraq

    A speech by an ex-MI6 boss hints at a plan going back over a decade. In some areas, being Shia is akin to being a Jew in Nazi Germany, says Patrick Cockburn
    The evolution of Andy Serkis: First Gollum, then King Kong - now the actor is swinging through the trees in Dawn of the Planet of the Apes

    The evolution of Andy Serkis

    First Gollum, then King Kong - now the actor is swinging through the trees in Dawn of the Planet of the Apes
    You thought 'Benefits Street' was controversial: Follow-up documentary 'Immigrant Street' has got locals worried

    You thought 'Benefits Street' was controversial...

    Follow-up documentary 'Immigrant Street' has got locals worried
    Refugee children from Central America let down by Washington's high ideals

    Refugee children let down by Washington's high ideals

    Democrats and Republicans refuse to set aside their differences to cope with the influx of desperate Central Americas, says Rupert Cornwell
    Children's books are too white, says Laureate

    Children's books are too white, says Laureate

    Malorie Blackman appeals for a better ethnic mix of authors and characters and the illustrator Quentin Blake comes to the rescue
    Blackest is the new black: Scientists have developed a material so dark that you can't see it...

    Blackest is the new black

    Scientists have developed a material so dark that you can't see it...
    Matthew Barzun: America's diplomatic dude

    Matthew Barzun: America's diplomatic dude

    The US Ambassador to London holds 'jeans and beer' gigs at his official residence – it's all part of the job, he tells Chris Green
    Meet the Quantified Selfers: From heart rates to happiness, there is little this fast-growing, self-tracking community won't monitor

    Meet the 'Quantified Selfers'

    From heart rates to happiness, there is little this fast-growing, self-tracking community won't monitor
    Madani Younis: Five-star reviews are just the opening act for British theatre's first non-white artistic director

    Five-star reviews are just the opening act for British theatre's first non-white artistic director

    Madani Younis wants the neighbourhood to follow his work as closely as his audiences do
    Mrs Brown and her boys: are they having a laugh?

    Mrs Brown and her boys: are they having a laugh?

    When it comes to national stereotyping, the Irish – among others – know it can pay to play up to outsiders' expectations, says DJ Taylor