Tunnel vision

Tunnel vision

Imagine this: you're an impecunious young tourist drinking in the sights of London, but you've forgotten to bring a camera. You can't afford a flashy Nikon job, and you've got to get a present for Aunt Hilda to coo over in her Dutch windmill. And you've only got pounds 17.99 to your name. Don't panic, because those thoughtful people at Concord have invented the first ever London Underground camera. It's a fully featured photographic machine, with flash, easy loading and so on, and it's finished in one of the 12 tube line colours, with the famous logo emblazoned on the front - subsequent editions can make use of a unique licensing deal with London Underground's own graphic archive. It makes a fine tourist buy, as it also comes with a specially commissioned tourist attraction map, so you can find your way to the things you want to photograph, and it will be a delightful souvenir for Hilda when you get back. In fact, after an intrepid testing session down the local, your reporter can confidently pronounce that it works rather better than London Underground itself - no 15-minute delays or flickering bulbs here. As if this wasn't enough, Concord also have two other tourist cameras available: the Snap 'n' Map, an all-in-one disposable camera complete with film and tourist guide (pounds 9.99) and the Snap Jack, a 35mm model branded with that symbol of international friendliness, the Union Jack. All smart stuff, and bound to raise a laugh from East Asian visitors: visible just under the lens of these proudly British cameras is the legend "Japan Optics".

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