The man who found himself at the centre of a viral BBC interview when his children interrupted a live broadcast has said he is "flattered" by the generally positive reaction to the moment. 

Robert Kelly, an American associate professor at Pusan National University in South Korea, was speaking with the BBC via Skype about the impeachment of president Park Guen-hye when his daughter Marion danced into his office. 

She was followed by his nine-month-old son James, who arrived in a baby walker, and quickly followed by Kelly's wife Kim Jung-a who rounded the children up and herded them out of the room as he tried to maintain some composure.

Speaking at a press conference in South Korea with his wife and children - who definitely stole the show once again - Kelly said that he was "happy our family blooper - our family error on television - brought so much laughter to so many people."

Kelly revealed that he spotted his daughter in the reflection on his computer screen when she walked in.

"I was hoping that maybe my daughter might sit down and read a book or something, even for 30 seconds until we could just cut the interview, but once my son came in on the little roller, then it was sort of... there was nothing I could do," he told the BBC.

He added that he was concerned that the moment had harmed him professionally.

"We [he and his wife] were mortified. We assumed that no television network would ever call me again to speak."

In a separate statement he said: "My family and I would like to thank our many well-wishers. We are just a regular family, and raising two young children can be a lot of work.

"I was not shoving Marion out of the way. I was trying to slide her behind my chair where there are children's toys and books, in hopes she would play with them for a few moments until the interview ended."

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