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Shaun the Sheep voted best BBC children's TV character ever

Nick Park's Shaun the Sheep beat Postman Pat and Sooty & Sweep

Shaun the Sheep has been voted the best BBC children’s TV character of all time, ahead of loveable Postman Pat and even international superstar Bob the Builder.

A poll of over 41,000 people placed Shaun as the best out of all the animations or puppets that have been churned out by the public broadcaster over the last 70 years.

Voters chose from a shortlist of 18 – three for each decade – which had been compiled by the poll’s creators, the Radio Times, and the British Film Institute (BFI).

Postman Pat did take the silver medal, however, beating Sooty & Sweep, which made it to third.

Richard Starzak, the creator of Shaun the Sheep, said: “I’m chuffed, flattered and delighted, on behalf of everyone who has worked on Shaun the Sheep, for this honour.

“Many BBC animated characters were a big and important part of my childhood. It’s amazing to think that Shaun will be part of so many people’s happy memories.”


For the uninitiated, Shaun the Sheep is actually a spin off from the award-winning 1995 Wallace and Gromit movie A Close Shave.

The official Wallace & Gromit brand describes Shaun as having a colourful personality: “What he lacks in size, he makes up in character: curious, brave and an all-round appetite on legs.

“Eats anything, anywhere. Fleeced but not stirred.”

His popularity in the film won him a host of fans, leading to his own show which was initially broadcast on CBBC.

He has since featured in 130 episodes and has appeared in countless DVDs – while his debut on the big screen was due for March 2015 but looks set to be ready for February.

Each decade was broken down and had its own winner. The victors for each of the ten years ranging from the Fifties onwards are as follows:

“Every generation has a favourite which lingers for a lifetime. Our winner, Shaun the Sheep, will be remembered in 50 years’ time, just as the children of the 80s voted for Postman Pat, and Sooty and Sweep remain hugely popular almost 60 years after they were first broadcast," said Ben Preston, Radio Times editor.

“It's a testament to the enduring quality of British children's television that a contemporary character topped the poll in a shortlist filled with classic programmes from the last seven decades.”