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The News Matrix: Friday 9 May 2014

One-two punch could floor cancer

Scientists from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have developed a twin nanoparticle drug-delivery system that sensitises cancer cells and then kills them. In tests, the treatment destroyed cancers that survived if they had not been “softened up” first.

Social worker: Oscar was ‘heartbroken’

A social worker who was assigned to give Oscar Pistorius emotional support after the killing of his girlfriend, Reeva Steenkamp, told a court yesterday that the South African athlete on trial for her murder was “heartbroken” over  the shooting.

More UK jihadists fighting in Syria

The Government is increasingly concerned about the number of young people travelling to Syria to fight. The Metropolitan Police said it had arrested 40 people on charges relating to the Syrian conflict in the first three months of 2014, compared with 25 for all 2013.

Pair convicted after dog mauling

Two women have been convicted of offences under the Dangerous Dogs Act after a pensioner was mauled to death. Hayley Sulley, 30, and Della Woods, 29, admitted at Liverpool Crown Court they allowed the “out of control” dog to fatally injure 79-year-old Clifford Clarke.

Pro-Russia rebels out of Putin’s control

Pro-Moscow rebels in eastern Ukraine are set ignored a call by Russian President Vladimir Putin to postpone a referendum on self-rule on Sunday, declaring they would go ahead with the poll.

Free schools ‘a risk’ to state’s finances

The free school system has been criticised for failing “to ensure public money is used properly”.  A spending watchdog said the scheme was creating risk by  opening new schools “at such speed”. The report comes at a time of growing concern over school finances and controversy over one headteacher’s £200,000 salary.

Women over 30 at risk from inactivity

A sedentary lifestyle is more likely to cause heart disease in women over 30 than smoking, obesity or high-blood pressure, research shows. Using data from more than 32,000 women, Australian researchers warned that the dangers of inactivity were being underestimated.

Blasphemy lawyer shot dead in office

A lawyer who has become well known for defending high-profile cases of blasphemy has been shot and killed at his office in Multan. Rasheed Rehman’s murder came after he agreed to defend a college lecturer. Mr Rehman, 53, had reportedly received death threats.

Arguments can lead to early grave

Continually arguing with a spouse, friend or neighbour is bad for your health and could even lead to an early grave. A study of 10,000 men and women found people who argued “always or often” with someone in their social circle were up to three times more likely to die over a nine-year period.

Wheat farming link to individualism

Scientists have come up with a new theory for why the West is more individualistic than the East: wheat farming. A study in the journal Science proposes that growing paddy rice needs ample water, forcing neighbours to work together. Wheat farmers, in contrast, rely on the rain and operate independently.

Rare dancing frogs found in mountains

It was a good day for dancing frogs yesterday when scientists announced that they had discovered 14 new species in the mountainous jungles if southern India. The frogs’ unusual method of attracting mates – involving kicking out their rear legs – have earned them the nickname of dancing frogs.

Journalists come to blows on live TV

Two journalists having a  televised debate about the  civil war in neighbouring Syria  overturned the table on  each other during an on-air  brawl. The speakers broke  apart the studio table at which  they had been sitting, in an attempt to fight one another.

State curbs use of cuddly mascots

They have been popular in Japan for years, but could cuddly mascots be on their way out? State-funded mascots could be axed as bosses of state bodies have been asked to help curb the country’s fixation with cuteness. Mascots are used for a range of agencies including libraries, tax collection and traffic safety.

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