A bold new look for beauty

Get ready to face next season with a makeover of your beauty bag. There's a brave new world of hair, make-up and nail trends out there, says Carola Long


Smoky eyes

Such a sexy season wouldn't be complete without come-to-bed eyes, as seen at Vivienne Westwood, Roberto Cavalli, Gucci and Dsquared2. Winged shadow at several shows created a sultry, cat-like shape. At Westwood the look (by MAC) was inspired by gangs of teenage girls and their first, heavy-handed experimentation with make-up, but the technique was anything but basic. For the eyes, senior artist Neil Young used over six products including MAC's Eye Kohl in Smolder and Liquid Liner in Boot Black.

Zoom Lash mascara, £12, MAC; Smoky Eyes palette in No 6, £34, Chanel

Bold lips

From scarlets and crimsons to deep berries and plums, the catwalks were alight with shades of red. YSL models sported a little-red-Corvette hue, while a darker, more dangerous burgundy appeared at Dior. Whichever colour you choose, however, according to Paul Herrington, head of artistry at Bobbi Brown, a perfect lip outline is essential. He suggests that dark lipstick should be applied with a brush and followed with a matching liner for the smoothest possible finish. Dior and Gucci abandoned the adage that you should only emphasis lips or eyes, but dual drama should be approached with caution. Avoid the 'Addicted to Love' look – teaming a true red with black eye make up – and opt for berry or brownish reds with dramatic eyes. Wear bright red with a flick of black liner, mascara and minimal shadow.

Colour Fever lipstick in 151, £17.50, Lancôme; Lip Sheer in Plum, £15, Bobbi Brown


As seen at Chloé, Alessandro Dell' Acqua and Gucci, this is a high-risk trend. Executed well, it evokes early-Eighties Christie Brinkley and Brooke Shields, but it could all too easily veer towards Angie Watts from EastEnders. MAC's Neil Young says, "It wasn't just about emphasising cheekbones, but also temples and brows to enhance the whole structure of the face and bring it alive." He recommends softening the trend and sticking to "edible fudges, caramels and toffees", and getting a professional lesson. For surgery-free instant cheekbones, Young suggests imagining an invisible line from the top of the ear to the corner of the mouth, then bringing the cheek colour into the face stopping when it is in line with the pupil of the eye.

Studio Sculpt foundation, £22.50, MAC



Cascading waves à la Jerry Hall and Veronica Lake (as seen at Chanel, Issa, and Chloé) were one of the season's most glamorous trends. Oribe, the hairdresser renowned for creating supermodel volume in the early Nineties, recommends "old fashioned techniques in combination with products that hold shape whilst allowing hair to look natural". He says, "I start by using Oribe Magnificent Volume Shampoo and Conditioner, then spray with my Volumista and Impermeable sprays before using irons. Work the hair section by section and pin up the curls with bobby pins to set before brushing out. Finish with hairspray to achieve an ultra-dry finish that won't dampen or dull the style."

Oribe Volumista £28, available exclusively at SpaceNK from October


Recently sported by Drew Barrymore and Diane Kruger, summer braids exuded romantic or classical elegance. However now the plait comes with a punkier twist as well; think rebellious schoolgirl rather than teacher's-pet prettiness. At Giles, tangled hair was roughly twisted into a plait at the back of the head, while at Topshop Unique models' multiple braids suggested itinerant ravers in an apocalyptic wasteland crossed with Boy George. At Twenty8Twelve, Luke Hersheson styled models' hair with tight but messy plaits at the side of the head and a quiff on the top.

Bandball, £16, Bumble and Bumble


Its image was tarnished in the late Nineties by the female cast of Hollyoaks, but early Nineties-style straight hair is back. Think grunge, Corinne Day's pictures of Kate Moss and middle partings. The hairstylist Luke Hersheson, from the Daniel Hersheson salon, is suitably wary, but suggests taking a modern approach by straightening the hair, then softening the look with a spritz of water (you don't want it to hang like two sheets of uncooked lasagna) to bring back some of the natural kink. At Balenciaga and Hussein Chalayan hair was parted in the middle, giving a more youthful feel.


Clever colour

Look beyond the obvious pinks or blood reds this season and go for a shade that's a little bit unexpected. Dark and decadent or pale and interesting. Try Diabolic, a deep black with garnet from Chanel – who invariably bring out 'le must' in terms of nail colours – or Mink Muffs from Essie, a smoky taupe shade. MAC's forthcoming capsule collection, created by the nail expert Jin Soon Choi who has worked with Steven Meisel and Prada amongst others, features colours such as Rich Dark Delicious – a deep coffee – and Beyond Jealous – a blackened blue-green. Green is Choi's hot tip (keep it dark or muted rather than Christmas tree) and she suggests a short length and rounded shape: "Long nails look cheesy!" The biggest statement – don't try this at home unless you are steady-handed – were the stripes of black at Thakoon, with white tips and crescent cuticles.

Polish in Beyond Jealous, £8, MAC; polish in Mink Muffs, £8.95, Essie, both available in September