You can grow anything from lettuce and beets to aubergine and okra / Getty Images/iStockphoto

It allows customers to know exactly where their food is coming from

Nowadays, a wealth of products are available at the click of a mouse for food lovers, with craft beers and hand-reared veggies delivered to their door but one company have decided to do things a little differently.

For around £65 month, you can now manage your very own piece of land and eat all the organic produce grown on it.

Brazilian based company Mandala da Montanha, was set up by Martin Schneesche and Alexandre Yokoyama in 2015 as a farm for selling home-grown food but, unlike other subscriptions services, it allows the consumers to be part of the farming process.

Tapping into the rise of the Millennials for whom convenience is King, this service lets people decide what they want to plant - from a variety of lettuces, beets, onions and spinach to more indigenous ingredients like scarlet aubergine and okra - and for a small fee, delivers it right to their front door.

There’s no doubt that Millenials’ ‘I know what I want and I want it now’ attitude is changing the food industry but the duo insist that Mandala is about much more than indulging people’s hankering for convenience.

“Being a little farmer sucks sometimes, because most people think that a lettuce head is always the same, which it is not. 

Distributors only want pretty vegetables, and always with the lowest cost possible. So we decided to sell directly to our clients, who value our products,” Schneesche told Munchies.

It also allows customers to know exactly where their food is coming from, how it was produced and fundamentally reduces food waste.

With their ten square metres of land, if someone produces an excess of food the owner can decide to trade the remaining harvest with another subscriber who has also over-produced their lot. 

What’s more, Mandala also offers classes to its subscribers in regenerative agriculture, tool handling, land management and cultural dealings at no additional cost. 

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