Sparkle goes out of a fashionable affair for no-show Lohan

More evidence that fashion's love affair with flash trash celebrity is on the wane came to the fore at the Ungaro show that followed McCartney's.

Six months ago now it was announced, with great fanfare, that the actress Lindsay Lohan had been appointed artistic director of the label. "It will be an explosive combination," the brand's then CEO, Mounir Moufarrige said at the time and the reaction of the press as Lohan stepped out to take her bows alongside Ungaro designer Estrella Archs appeared to prove his point. Only a season later, however, and Lohan was conspicuous by her absence particularly given that she has made an appearance front row in both Paris and Milan for other brands. An Ungaro spokesperson told fashion trade paper Women's Wear Daily that Lohan was "not involved" with this new collection. However, the powers that be at the house refused to comment on whether she was still under contract or not.

If Lohan ultimately did little to improve the fortunes of Ungaro – the collection she worked on was ill-received – this latest offering, courtesy of Archs alone, had more depth.

As the first outfit came out – a gold blazer teamed with cropped leopard-print trousers, fuchsia blouse, emerald sash and oversized clutch bag to match – it immediately became apparent that the young designer was attempting a move away from the type of attention-seeking garb that Lohan and her ilk are attracted to in favour of an aesthetic that was more closely indebted to the old values of this auspicious French name. Emanuel Ungaro, who retired in 2004, was known for both a vivid use of colour and for colliding print, both of which were here all present and correct.

Exuberant sunray pleats, polka dots and florals were juxtaposed with more subdued elements – a pair of black wool city shorts, for example, or the by now ubiquitous camel coat – as the collection moved from day to evening at which point liquid silks in jewel colours and highly decorative little black dresses in organza were less substantial in flavour and less timely for it.