Tradition is the key as the Empire strikes back

Tweed, tartan and classic reds rule at Fashion Week

Red was the colour of London Fashion Week, along with traditional materials such as tweed and tartan. It all invoked a mood of the classic county clan and set, well, a rather regal tone. There has been a great appetite for such hyperbolic Anglophilia, with the British Empire as a reference at Jaeger London and the great outdoors as an inspiration at Daks.

Founded in 1934 as a menswear label, Daks used its newly opened in-house museum to resuscitate its signature archive checks. Outerwear detailing, such as large buttons and lining fabrics, informed many of the pieces; full skirts appeared to be made from the quilted lining of a shooting jacket. Models recalled Carey Mulligan in An Education, although bluestocking styling contrasted with loose gauge scarves and ponchos with plenty of bounce.

Jaeger London meanwhile showed tomato-bright blazers cut in collarless, minimal shapes and fiercely creased crimson cigarette pants. These were matched with camel blouses and jackets, sleeveless navy waistcoats and crombies that featured oversized cartoonish lapel detailing.

And national treasure Betty Jackson showed bright and fleecy wool coats belted atop more muted terracotta shades and knitwear of varied weights, which gave structure to a looser classic silhouette. There were ox-blood leather jackets with bow-back details, and hooded scarlet blousons offset by much lighter tiered chiffon dresses in swirling floral prints.

Tradition prevailed again at Daniella Helayel's Issa, which has come to the fore since Kate Middleton wore an Issa dress on the day she and Prince William announced their engagement. Inspiration came from Audrey Hepburn and Wallis Simpson – a combination that conjures Ms Middleton's own blend of demure and daring.

But the next generation were using colour and traditional fabrics in quite a different way. Clothes were riotously bright at collections by young designers Louise Gray and Henry Holland. Gray's tweeds were laced with metallic flashes and large gold polka-dots on girlish wool coats. Tartan and plaid were spliced together on boxy jackets and shorts, further decorated with tassels and fringing.

Those tweedy clichés were spun again at House of Holland, reworked on herringbone wool bustier dresses embellished withpearls and in a near-trompe l'oeil denim shade. There were fuchsia herringbone skirt suits, too, with vinyl detailing on lapels and pockets, and psychedelic orange, pink and purple-checked coats over tights printed with bingo balls. It was the perfect whimsical-with-a-hint-of-retro collection for Holland's cool kid and socialite clubgoer clientele.

London Fashion Week continues tomorrow with shows from Top Shop Unique and Matthew Williamson

Life and Style
ebookNow available in paperback
ebooks
ebookPart of The Independent’s new eBook series The Great Composers
  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

ES Rentals

    iJobs Job Widget
    iJobs Fashion

    Guru Careers: Creative Director / Head of Creative

    £65K - £75K (DOE) + Benefits: Guru Careers: We are seeking a Creative Director...

    Recruitment Genius: IT Technical Support Engineer

    £18000 - £25000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This successful IT reseller bas...

    Recruitment Genius: Sales Engineer / Technical Sales Representative - OTE £35k

    £30000 - £35000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: One of the Country's leading di...

    Recruitment Genius: Logistics Coordinator - Part-Time

    £10000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This is an exciting opportunity to join ...

    Day In a Page

    Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

    Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

    How a costume drama became a Sunday night staple
    Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers as he pushes Tories on housing

    Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers

    Labour leader pushes Tories on housing
    Aviation history is littered with grand failures - from the the Bristol Brabazon to Concorde - but what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?

    Aviation history is littered with grand failures

    But what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?
    Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of Soviet-style 'iron curtains' right across Europe

    Fortress Europe?

    Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of 'iron curtains'
    Never mind what you're wearing, it's what you're reclining on

    Never mind what you're wearing

    It's what you're reclining on that matters
    General Election 2015: Chuka Umunna on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband

    Chuka Umunna: A virus of racism runs through Ukip

    The shadow business secretary on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband
    Yemen crisis: This exotic war will soon become Europe's problem

    Yemen's exotic war will soon affect Europe

    Terrorism and boatloads of desperate migrants will be the outcome of the Saudi air campaign, says Patrick Cockburn
    Marginal Streets project aims to document voters in the run-up to the General Election

    Marginal Streets project documents voters

    Independent photographers Joseph Fox and Orlando Gili are uploading two portraits of constituents to their website for each day of the campaign
    Game of Thrones: Visit the real-life kingdom of Westeros to see where violent history ends and telly tourism begins

    The real-life kingdom of Westeros

    Is there something a little uncomfortable about Game of Thrones shooting in Northern Ireland?
    How to survive a social-media mauling, by the tough women of Twitter

    How to survive a Twitter mauling

    Mary Beard, Caroline Criado-Perez, Louise Mensch, Bunny La Roche and Courtney Barrasford reveal how to trounce the trolls
    Gallipoli centenary: At dawn, the young remember the young who perished in one of the First World War's bloodiest battles

    At dawn, the young remember the young

    A century ago, soldiers of the Empire – many no more than boys – spilt on to Gallipoli’s beaches. On this 100th Anzac Day, there are personal, poetic tributes to their sacrifice
    Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves

    Follow the money as never before

    Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves, reports Rupert Cornwell
    Samuel West interview: The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents

    Samuel West interview

    The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents
    General Election 2015: Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

    Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

    Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, on what the leaders' appearances tell us about them
    Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

    Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

    The architect of the HeForShe movement and head of UN Women on the world's failure to combat domestic violence