Gone right off eggs? Try blood (even in ice cream) ... The grisly ingredient is overlooked, say cutting-edge culinary experts

The Nordic Food Lab says blood is nutritious, delicious and could be the solution to the growing problem of allergies

It is an "edgy, almost forbidden" ingredient that could make the bravest of cooks turn the colour of the traditional chef's uniform... white. Despite blood being the clearest "brute fact" that animals have been slaughtered to put food on a plate before us, one of the world's top culinary teams is calling for blood to be used more widely in the everyday food we eat.

The Nordic Food Lab says blood is nutritious, delicious and could be the solution to the growing problem of egg allergies. The Copenhagen-based lab has become an innovator in culinary science since it was created in 2008 by the Danish chef René Redzepi, the man behind Noma, three-time winner of the best restaurant in the world title.

Blood has similar properties to eggs in cooking and also is a good source of iron, Elizabeth Paul of the Food Lab said: "Blood has become somehow edgy, almost forbidden, yet it has been used as food for as long as animals have been killed and eaten. It is elemental, both mystical and mundane. And it makes us damn curious in the kitchen."

They believe it is a natural replacement for egg whites and should used more widely now that eggs are Europe's second most common food allergy. The lab had successfully experimented in substituting blood for eggs in cakes, meringues, pancakes and ice cream, among other sweet dishes.

Using blood to make meringues, she wrote, seemed "difficult texture-wise at first, but once the whipped blood and sugar form this magnificent foam, all doubts are cleared". "Probably one of the strangest textures Nordic Food Lab has seen, and one of the most beautiful," she said.

She admitted that using blood in the kitchen "drove us to the edge". While blood is still used to make sausages and black pudding, Ms Paul questioned why "the tradition of cooking with blood [is] disappearing from our kitchen". She said that people seemed to have forgotten how to use it.

The food lab is no stranger to pushing culinary boundaries. In 2012, it made headlines when it argued that humans should start eating more insects, lauding their high protein content and role as a more sustainable form of food production. Grasshoppers, black ants and bee larvae were all recommended.

One chef unlikely to embrace their recommendation is Nick Nairn, who vomited on his own television show after watching a Hebridean crofter stir up blood to make black pudding. "It was probably the worst moment in my life," he said later, blaming the "more than a few hot toddies" that he had drunk the night before.

"It had been lying out overnight in the bucket and had congealed. And when Ena [the crofter] started putting it all together, it just slopped out," he said. "That's when I knew I was going to lose my breakfast."

Daniel Doherty, the executive chef at Duck & Waffle in London, who was awarded the "rising star" title in the 2013 Tatler Restaurant Awards, said he was "up for trying anything new".

"I think a lot of people would enjoy it, provided they don't think too much into it," he said. "I can see people being squeamish, but it's totally unnecessary, considering a lot of things that sneak their way into food, burgers, for example."

Blood ice cream

This recipe from the Nordic Food Lab is inspired by variations of the traditional Italian dessert sanguinaccio. Uses one Pacojet container. Serves 12

We have run trials with roasted barley koji (barley grains mixed with a fermenting agent) which is a brilliant alternative and ingredient in its own right – especially in combination with blood, giving body, bittersweet complexity and increasing the malty notes of the moulded, toasted grain taste.

300ml pig blood

60g roasted koji

300g milk

200g cream

88g trimoline

2.8g guar gum

The day before, grind roasted koji to fine powder and cold-infuse it into 300ml of milk. Leave at 4C for 24h.

On the day, pass cold infusion through a superbag and measure yield. Add more whole milk to reach weight of 300g.

Strain pig blood to remove coagulated protein clumps. Add cream, blood and trimoline to mixture and start to heat over water bath while stirring constantly. Once temperature reaches 50C, add guar gum and continue stirring until mixture thickens to chocolate brown custard. Heat until 75C and hold at temperature for 15 seconds. Fill Pacojet container and freeze.

Once frozen, spin in Pacojet [professional-grade blender] and serve.

News
people'It can last and it's terrifying'
Sport
Danny Welbeck's Manchester United future is in doubt
footballGunners confirm signing from Manchester United
Sport
footballStriker has moved on loan for the remainder of the season
Sport
footballFeaturing Bart Simpson
PROMOTED VIDEO
Life and Style
ebooksA superb mix of recipes serving up the freshest of local produce in a delicious range of styles
Life and Style
ebooksFrom the lifespan of a slug to the distance to the Sun: answers to 500 questions from readers
News
Katie Hopkins appearing on 'This Morning' after she purposefully put on 4 stone.
peopleKatie Hopkins breaks down in tears over weight gain challenge
Arts and Entertainment
Olivia Colman topped the list of the 30 most influential females in broadcasting
tv
News
Kelly Brook
peopleA spokesperson said the support group was 'extremely disappointed'
News
The five geckos were launched into space to find out about the effects of weightlessness on the creatures’ sex lives
i100
Life and Style
techIf those brochure kitchens look a little too perfect to be true, well, that’s probably because they are
Sport
Andy Murray celebrates a shot while playing Jo-Wilfried Tsonga
TennisWin sets up blockbuster US Open quarter-final against Djokovic
Arts and Entertainment
Hare’s a riddle: Kit Williams with the treasure linked to Masquerade
booksRiddling trilogy could net you $3m
Arts and Entertainment
Alex Kapranos of Franz Ferdinand performs live
music Pro-independence show to take place four days before vote
News
news Video - hailed as 'most original' since Benedict Cumberbatch's
News
i100
Life and Style
The longer David Sedaris had his Fitbit, the further afield his walks took him through the West Sussex countryside
lifeDavid Sedaris: What I learnt from my fitness tracker about the world
Arts and Entertainment
Word master: Self holds up a copy of his novel ‘Umbrella’
booksUnlike 'talented mediocrity' George Orwell, you must approach this writer dictionary in hand
News
i100
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

ES Rentals

    iJobs Job Widget
    iJobs Food & Drink

    Marketing Executive / Member Services Exec

    £20 - 26k + Benefits: Guru Careers: A Marketing Executive / Member Services Ex...

    Sales Account Manager

    £15,000 - £25,000: Recruitment Genius: A fantastic opportunity has arisen for ...

    VB.NET and C# developer (VB.NET,C#,ASP.NET)

    £30000 - £45000 per annum + Bonus+Benefits+Package: Harrington Starr: VB.NET a...

    Business Development Manager / Sales Pro

    £30 - 35k + Uncapped Comission (£70k Y1 OTE): Guru Careers: A Business Develop...

    Day In a Page

    'I’ll tell you what I would not serve - lamb and potatoes': US ambassador hits out at stodgy British food served at diplomatic dinners

    'I’ll tell you what I would not serve - lamb and potatoes'

    US ambassador hits out at stodgy British food
    Radio Times female powerlist: A 'revolution' in TV gender roles

    A 'revolution' in TV gender roles

    Inside the Radio Times female powerlist
    Endgame: James Frey's literary treasure hunt

    James Frey's literary treasure hunt

    Riddling trilogy could net you $3m
    Fitbit: Because the tingle feels so good

    Fitbit: Because the tingle feels so good

    What David Sedaris learnt about the world from his fitness tracker
    Saudis risk new Muslim division with proposal to move Mohamed’s tomb

    Saudis risk new Muslim division with proposal to move Mohamed’s tomb

    Second-holiest site in Islam attracts millions of pilgrims each year
    Alexander Fury: The designer names to look for at fashion week this season

    The big names to look for this fashion week

    This week, designers begin to show their spring 2015 collections in New York
    Will Self: 'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

    'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

    Will Self takes aim at Orwell's rules for writing plain English
    Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

    Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

    Toy guns proving a popular diversion in a country flooded with the real thing
    Al Pacino wows Venice

    Al Pacino wows Venice

    Ham among the brilliance as actor premieres two films at festival
    Neil Lawson Baker interview: ‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.

    Neil Lawson Baker interview

    ‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.
    The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

    The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

    Wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding her husband
    The model of a gadget launch: Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed

    The model for a gadget launch

    Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed
    Alice Roberts: She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

    She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

    Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
    Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

    Get well soon, Joan Rivers

    She is awful. But she's also wonderful, not in spite of but because of the fact she's forever saying appalling things, argues Ellen E Jones
    Doctor Who Into the Dalek review: A classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster

    A fresh take on an old foe

    Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering