Epic Mickey 2: The Power of Two – Review

view gallery VIEW GALLERY

An unfinished job, and for a license as big as Mickey Mouse, that just isn't good enough.

The first Epic Mickey game was full of potential, but an overabundance of bugs and glitches just kept it back from achieving its potential. There were high hopes then that this second bite at the cherry would create a whimsical 3D platforming adventure that the House of Mouse could really be proud of. Unfortunately, that just isn’t the case.

The innovation of the first game has been replaced by a cloud of confusion and frustration, with even the simplest of tasks often leaving you pulling your hair out. There’s charm here, as you’d expect from a game with the Disney stamp of approval. But it’s drowned below a sea of poorly thought out set pieces, forgettable characters, and a story that fails to make you care about anything for more than a couple of seconds.

The game picks up just after the original finishes, and if you don’t know the plot of that game you’re going to be left scratching your head for long stretches of this one. The basic story revolves around Mickey teaming up with Oswald the Lucky Rabbit to try and save the Wasteland from another threat; hence ‘The Power of Two’.

Mickey has his paintbrush once more, which he can use to either paint in or thin out sections of the world. The uses for your brush are always tightly controlled – sometimes it’s necessary for progression, other times you’ll be required to create or destroy simply to fill your cash and paint reserves.

Major decisions involving whether you use paint or thinner are supposed to change the world around you, forcing you down one path or another, but it’s such a poorly explained mechanic that it’s hard to really quantify the effect it’s having.

Oswald has a remote control that he can use to send pulses of electricity into contraptions to bring them back to life, as well as create a field of shimmering energy around himself and Mickey to protect them from attack.

A second player can jump in at any time and take over the role of Oswald, and it comes as a blessed relief from the slightly confused AI. The ability to switch characters on the fly would be a real boon, but it’s an seemingly obvious feature made conspicuous by its absence.

The camera angles and control issues that marred the original are still in place too, stealing the flow from your movement and leaving you battling against the game, rather than working in tandem with it.

The story flops along at a confusing pace too, rarely letting you get a handle on what you’re supposed to be doing, where you’re going, or whether or not it’s a good idea. NPCs will shout the same phrase at you over and over again until you manage to complete the task they’ve set you, which adds to the overwhelming feeling of annoyance that permeates the game.

It’s a shame, because yet again there is potential here, and moments when that potential shines through. But most of the time it gets lost underneath poorly implemented and badly explained features.

In a world where games like LittleBigPlanet exist, there just isn’t room for sub-standard platformers, and that’s exactly what Epic Mickey 2 is. It’s an unfinished job, and for a license as big as Mickey Mouse, that just isn’t good enough.

By Harry Slater

Score: 2/5

Format: PS3, Xbox 360, Wii U
Price: £49.99
Developer: Blitz Games Studios
Publisher: Disney

PROMOTED VIDEO
Life and Style
ebookNow available in paperback
ebooks
ebookPart of The Independent’s new eBook series The Great Composers
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

ES Rentals

    iJobs Job Widget
    iJobs Gadgets & Tech

    Ashdown Group: Application Support Engineer with SQL skills

    £28000 per annum: Ashdown Group: A highly reputable business is looking to rec...

    Ashdown Group: Trainee / Graduate Helpdesk Analyst

    £20000 per annum: Ashdown Group: A highly reputable business is looking to rec...

    Ashdown Group: (PHP / Python) - Global Media firm - London

    £50000 per annum + 26 days holiday,pension: Ashdown Group: A highly successful...

    Recruitment Genius: Web Developer - ASP.Net, C#

    £28000 - £35000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This business IT support compan...

    Day In a Page

    Syria crisis: Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more refugees as one young mother tells of torture by Assad regime

    Celebrities call on David Cameron to take more Syrian refugees

    One young mother tells of torture by Assad regime
    The enemy within: People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back – with promising results

    The enemy within

    People who hear voices in their heads are being encouraged to talk back
    'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

    'In Auschwitz you got used to anything'

    Survivors of the Nazi concentration camp remember its horror, 70 years on
    Autumn/winter menswear 2015: The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore

    Autumn/winter menswear 2015

    The uniforms that make up modern life come to the fore
    'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

    'I'm gay, and plan to fight military homophobia'

    Army general planning to come out
    Iraq invasion 2003: The bloody warnings six wise men gave to Tony Blair as he prepared to launch poorly planned campaign

    What the six wise men told Tony Blair

    Months before the invasion of Iraq in 2003, experts sought to warn the PM about his plans. Here, four of them recall that day
    25 years of The Independent on Sunday: The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century

    25 years of The Independent on Sunday

    The stories, the writers and the changes over the last quarter of a century
    Homeless Veterans appeal: 'Really caring is a dangerous emotion in this kind of work'

    Homeless Veterans appeal

    As head of The Soldiers' Charity, Martin Rutledge has to temper compassion with realism. He tells Chris Green how his Army career prepared him
    Wu-Tang Clan and The Sexual Objects offer fans a chance to own the only copies of their latest albums

    Smash hit go under the hammer

    It's nice to pick up a new record once in a while, but the purchasers of two latest releases can go a step further - by buying the only copy
    Geeks who rocked the world: Documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry

    The geeks who rocked the world

    A new documentary looks back at origins of the computer-games industry
    Belle & Sebastian interview: Stuart Murdoch reveals how the band is taking a new direction

    Belle & Sebastian is taking a new direction

    Twenty years ago, Belle & Sebastian was a fey indie band from Glasgow. It still is – except today, as prime mover Stuart Murdoch admits, it has a global cult following, from Hollywood to South Korea
    America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

    America: Land of the free, home of the political dynasty

    These days in the US things are pretty much stuck where they are, both in politics and society at large, says Rupert Cornwell
    A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

    A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form

    A veteran of the Fifties campaigns is inspiring a new generation of activists
    Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

    Winston Churchill: the enigma of a British hero

    A C Benson called him 'a horrid little fellow', George Orwell would have shot him, but what a giant he seems now, says DJ Taylor
    Growing mussels: Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project

    Growing mussels

    Precious freshwater shellfish are thriving in a unique green project