Ford creates 'drug driving suit' to simulate the dangers of getting behind the wheel when high

Ford wants to teach young people about the dangers of taking the car after having consumed illegal drugs such as a cannabis, cocaine, heroin and MDMA

Ford has created a "drugged driving" simulator suit to show motorists the effects of driving under the influence of illegal substances.

The car manufacturer says it wants to teach young people about the dangers of taking the car after having consumed illegal drugs such as a cannabis, cocaine, heroin and MDMA.

The "drugged driving suit" comes after a recent Government study, which shows people who take drugs before getting behind the wheel of a car believe it is a "much more acceptable" thing to do than driving while drunk. 

It is estimated that people driving while under the influence of drugs may account for as many as 200 deaths a year in the UK.

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The drug suit which makes drivers feel high was developed in collaboration with scientists from the Meyer-Hentschel Institute in Germany and stimulates slower reaction time, distorted vision, hand tremors and poor coordination.

Padding, ankle weights, goggles and headphones create the effects of reduced mobility and vision following the same model as the company’s drunk driving suit developed last year.

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The CEO of the Meyer-Hentschel Institute, Gundolf Meyer-Hentschel, explained: “We know that some drugs can cause trembling hands, so we incorporated a device into the suit that creates just such a tremor.

“Drug users sometimes see flashing lights in their peripheral field, an effect recreated by our goggles, while imaginary sounds are generated by the headphones. Additionally, the goggles distort perception, and produce colorful visual sensations – a side effect of LSD use.”

Driving a car with a “drugged driving suit” will be included  in Ford Driving Skills for Life’s driver education programme which provide driving training for people around the world.

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