Replica Back to the Future Hoverboard released

The famous hoverboard is available for around £33

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The Independent Tech

If you're a fan of 80s classic Back to the Future who may have been feeling a bit heavy since it was announced there’s absolutely no chance of a reboot, here’s a  piece of news that might cheer you up.

Online retailer HalloweenCostumes.com has a released a screen accurate, affordable replica of the famous hoverboard from Back to the Future II.

It comes complete with hoverplates on the bottom, Velcro strap on the top and, of course, the garish, so 80s it hurts, pink colour scheme.

It should probably be stipulated that the one crucial feature the board is lacking is the ability to actually hover.

However at the price of around £33, this is perhaps to be expected. And it’s certainly much cheaper than buying a replica Delorean that can’t even time travel.

 

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HalloweenCostume.com

It also shouldn't really compromise the fact that it will be the perfect accessory to Nike's self-lacing Back to the Future trainers, scheduled for release later this year.

HalloweenCostume.com’s board isn’t quite the first hoverboard replica to appear. Mattel released their own in 2012 but at a price of £80, it may be slightly out of the range of the average fancy dress budget. It similarly was not able to hover.

Functional hoverboards though are no longer the purely the toys of imagination.

Last year tech company Hendo Hover created a board that is able to hover a few inches off the ground and operate similarly to the one used in the film by Marty McFly.

The science works in the same that it was envisioned in the film, through using a magnetic field to generate lift.

At the moment the board can only operate on a non-ferromagnetic conductor, essentially a special copper half-pipe the company have built.

The company hope that they will be able to build ‘hoverhouses’, essentially skateparks full of these surfaces.

Looking to the distant future, the company has said that they hope that the technology will one day be able to separate buildings from the ground during earthquakes.

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