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Health News

Cancer kills more men than women, data shows

Men are almost 40 per cent more likely than women to die from cancer, according to research published today. They are also about 70 per cent more likely to die from cancers that affect both men and women, excluding breast cancer and prostate cancer.

The findings are based on cancer rates in the population, adjusted for age, and are part of a new report from the National Cancer Intelligence Network (NCIN), Cancer Research UK and the Men's Health Forum.

There is "no known biological reason" why men should be more likely to develop cancer and die, the researchers said, but they suggested "stereotypical" male behaviours, such as down-playing early symptoms and not visiting the doctor, could be to blame.

The study found men were 16 per cent more likely to develop any type of cancer than women and more than 60 per cent more likely to develop cancers that can affect both sexes.

Professor David Forman from the NCIN said: "Men have a reputation for having a 'stiff upper lip' and not being as health-conscious as women. What we see from this report could be a reflection of this attitude, meaning men are less likely to make lifestyle changes that could reduce their risk of the disease and less likely to go to their doctor with cancer symptoms."