Doctor cleared over Shipman victim's examination

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A hospital consultant who carried out an incorrect post mortem examination of a patient given a lethal morphine injection by Harold Shipman was cleared today of serious professional misconduct.

A hospital consultant who carried out an incorrect post mortem examination of a patient given a lethal morphine injection by Harold Shipman was cleared today of serious professional misconduct.

The General Medical Council, sitting in Manchester, found that Dr David Lyle Bee, 74, did make mistakes during the post mortem examination but they did not amount to serious professional misconduct.

The GMC committee said they were impressed by the quality of the testimonies given about Dr Bee, especially since he had retired in 1995 and had not worked since.

They said at the time he was working the index of suspicion surrounding health professionals was relatively low and had changed considerably since the 1990s.

The GMC said: "The committee have been impressed by the quality of testimonials that has been put before them, given the fact that you retired from practice in 1995 and have no intention of returning to medical practice.

"The committee further notes that there have been no adverse findings against you during your long medical career."

They added: "Having considered all the circumstances of this case, the committee have concluded that your actions fell below the standard of care that might reasonably have been expected of you, and as such, constitute professional misconduct.

"However, they have concluded that you are not guilty of serious professional misconduct."

Dr Bee, although retired, is still registered with the GMC and retains the right to work.

Although he cannot work for the NHS over the age of 70, he can still write prescriptions for drugs, sign death certificates and accept money for carrying out examinations.

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