Eating more than five a day has ‘no extra health benefit,’ claim researchers

They found the average risk of death from all causes was reduced by about 5 per cent for each additional daily serving of fruit and vegetables - up to five

Eating more portions of fruit and vegetables than the recommended “five a day” has no additional benefit on reducing a person’s risk of death, researchers have suggested.

The findings contradict recent research which found that eating “seven a day” holds the lowest risk of death. The latest study, published on thebmj.com, examined the association between fruit and vegetable intake and risk of premature death.

Consuming five portions of fruit or vegetables is linked to a lower risk of premature death, but eating more portions appears to have no further effect, the study concluded.

Researchers from China and the US analysed 16 studies involving more than 830,000 participants. Higher consumption of fruit and vegetables was significantly associated with a lower risk of death from all causes, particularly cardiovascular disease.

They found the average risk of death from all causes was reduced by about 5 per cent for each additional daily serving of fruit and vegetables. But once a person had consumed five portions, there was no additional benefit noted for extra portions.

PA

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