British employees are working more overtime than ever before - often for no extra money

The survey, based on responses from 2,000 people in full time salaried or hourly employment, showed that regionally Londoners are putting in the most overtime—an average of 9.6 hours a week

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The amount of overtime that Brits put in has hit a record high according to a study, with employers working an average of 68 days more each year than they are contracted to, usually for no additional pay.

The study conducted by TotallyMoney.com, a website that provides price comparison services for credit cards, loans and mortgages, shows that 60 per cent of British workers say that they don’t have a good work-life balance and only a third say that they typically leave work on time.

The figures show a stark divide between men and women. While 43 per cent of men say that they are paid for overtime, only 30 per cent of women claim that they get extra cash for extra hours.

But 24 per cent of women say that they feel pressured to work overtime in order to progress their career, more than double the 11 per cent of men who say that they do.

The survey, based on responses from 2,000 people in full time salaried or hourly employment, showed that regionally Londoners are putting in the most overtime—an average of 9.6 hours a week.

The results chime with a recent analysis from the TUC trade union showing that the number of employees working longer hours than contracted had grown by 15 per cent in the last five years, hurting health and hampering productivity levels.

UK workers gave their employers £33.6bn of free labour last year by doing unpaid overtime, according to the TUC.

More than 5.3 million people put in an average of 7.7 hours a week in unpaid overtime during 2016, which is equivalent to an average of £6,301, the union said, while warning that employees working rights now risk getting worse as a result of Brexit.

“The government still doesn’t have a water-tight plan to stop working time protections getting weaker when we leave the EU,” said Frances O’Grady, general secretary of the TUC.

“The Prime Minister should promise to put a guarantee into our future trade deals with Europe that British workers will have a level playing field with EU workers.” 

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