Business Diary: Fund manager has identity crisis

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The Independent Online

As the boss of the world's largest bond fund, Pimco, one would expect Bill Gross to be a signed up member of the capitalist elite and a defender of the status quo. Far from it: in his latest report to Pimco investors, Gross lambasts greedy bankers and hopeless politicians before setting out his hopes for a better future. "America requires more than a makeover or a facelift," Gross says. "It needs a heart transplant [without] the contagious antibodies of money and finance filtering through the system... are record corporate profits a fair price for America's soul? A devil's bargain more than likely."



When downside brings the upside

Our congratulations to all the winners at last night's Sustainable City Awards, with the gongs handed out by Lord Smith at the Mansion House. But may we pay a particular tribute to Avalon Abseiling, which picked up the sustainable buildings award. Its staff are able to cut the cost of installing insulation in older high rises by abseiling down them – it's a job that requires both a head for heights and for business.



Forget eating. You are how you slouch

Are you a businessman wondering why your company never seems to clinch those crucial deals? Maybe you don't look right. The good news is that Michele Paradise, best known as one of the judges on TV's Britain's Next Top Model, can help. She's offering courses for business folk on how to make a decent impression. "Everyone sends out a message through the way they look and stand," she explains. "The problems is most people haven't got a clue what they're saying," If you haven't, presumably, you're saying the wrong thing.



Feed price brings home alien bacon

Pigs might fly? Well, not quite, but if you're speeding along in the countryside over the next few weeks watch out for the giant advertising banners the pig farming industry is putting up all over the place in an attempt to persuade more people to buy British pork. Pig feed prices are costing many farmers dearly, you see, and British farmers are suffering particularly badly at the hands of cheaper imports, often from places where welfare standards are not so high.

businessdiary@independent.co.uk

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