Cruise chief's €1.3m payoff set to anger Costa Concordia disaster victims

 

The boss of the business that operated the Costa Concordia, the cruise liner that sank off Italy in 2012 killing 32 people, was given a payoff of €1.3m even though he was retiring anyway.

News of the payoff for the Costa Crociere chairman Pier Luigi Foschi is bound to anger victims and relatives of those killed in the disaster, many of whom are still fighting for compensation.

It was Mr Foschi who was the public face of the company after the January 2012 tragedy, instantly blaming the captain of the ship, Francesco Schettino, for steering off the correct course. Mr Schettino's trial is still ongoing and he claims the ship's charts were inaccurate.

A little-noticed filing from the parent company, Carnival, said Mr Foschi was being paid €1m (£830,000) for his "waiver of claims" over the company and €250,000 as compensation for signing an agreement not to join a competitor for a certain period of time.

Mr Foschi, who also acted as chairman and chief executive of Carnival Asia, was paid $3.97m (£2.42m) in 2012, the last year for which accounts have been filed. He has shares in the company worth $4.7m, according to Bloomberg data.

The company said his payoff was merely part of the settlement negotiated with 66-year-old Mr Foschi as part of his retirement package.

Mitchell Proner, a lawyer acting for more than 100 friends and relatives of Concordia victims seeking compensation, said: "There's a phrase in Italian, 'The fish rots from the head down.' It is apropos that he is getting out of there with all that money. But we will not go away. We have clients all over the world dealing with horrible post-traumatic stress and physical injuries, people who lost relatives. But both Carnival and Costa have continually frustrated our efforts to come to any reasonable settlement."

The company has reportedly offered compensation of €11,000 to victims to pay for all damages including the value of the cruise. Last year it was reported that around a third had accepted the offer. It has paid more in certain cases. But many victims have said that is inadequate.

Despite the likely anger of those seeking compensation, Mr Foschi was highly praised yesterday within the company's upper echelons. Carnival's billionaire chairman, Micky Arison, who was criticised by some investors for leaving all the public statements on the Concordia sinking to Mr Foschi, said in an internal memo: "Pier contributed greatly to the success of our company over the years. He's a lifetime friend to all of us at Carnival, and his efforts helped transform our company."

Mr Foschi's long-term colleague and chief operating officer Howard Frank said he "led us to new heights around the world, while also helping us work through some of our most challenging times".

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
ebooks
ebooksAn introduction to the ground rules of British democracy
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
SPONSORED FEATURES
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs Money & Business

SThree: Trainee Recruitment Consultant

£20000 - £25000 per annum + competitive: SThree: Are you looking to take your ...

SThree: Trainee Recruitment Consultant

£20000 - £40000 per annum + competitive: SThree: Exciting career prospect for ...

Recruitment Genius: Content Writer - Global Financial Services

£25000 - £30000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: From modest beginnings the comp...

Recruitment Genius: Web Developer - PHP

£35000 - £40000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: From modest beginnings the comp...

Day In a Page

A groundbreaking study of 'Britain's Atlantis' long buried at the bottom of the North Sea could revolutionise how we see our prehistoric past

Britain's Atlantis

Scientific study beneath North Sea could revolutionise how we see the past
The Queen has 'done and said nothing that anybody will remember,' says Starkey

The Queen has 'done and said nothing that anybody will remember'

David Starkey's assessment
Oliver Sacks said his life has been 'an enormous privilege and adventure'

'An enormous privilege and adventure'

Oliver Sacks writing about his life
'Gibraltar is British, and it is going to stay British forever'

'Gibraltar is British, and it is going to stay British forever'

The Rock's Chief Minister hits back at Spanish government's 'lies'
Britain is still addicted to 'dirty coal'

Britain still addicted to 'dirty' coal

Biggest energy suppliers are more dependent on fossil fuel than a decade ago
Orthorexia nervosa: How becoming obsessed with healthy eating can lead to malnutrition

Orthorexia nervosa

How becoming obsessed with healthy eating can lead to malnutrition
Lady Chatterley is not obscene, says TV director

Lady Chatterley’s Lover

Director Jed Mercurio on why DH Lawrence's novel 'is not an obscene story'
Farmers in tropical forests are training ants to kill off bigger pests

Set a pest to catch a pest

Farmers in tropical forests are training ants to kill off bigger pests
Mexico: A culture that celebrates darkness as an essential part of life

The dark side of Mexico

A culture that celebrates darkness as an essential part of life
Being sexually assaulted was not your fault, Chrissie Hynde. Don't tell other victims it was theirs

Being sexually assaulted was not your fault, Chrissie Hynde

Please don't tell other victims it was theirs
A nap a day could save your life - and here's why

A nap a day could save your life

A midday nap is 'associated with reduced blood pressure'
If men are so obsessed by sex, why do they clam up when confronted with the grisly realities?

If men are so obsessed by sex...

...why do they clam up when confronted with the grisly realities?
The comedy titans of Avalon on their attempt to save BBC3

Jon Thoday and Richard Allen-Turner

The comedy titans of Avalon on their attempt to save BBC3
The bathing machine is back... but with a difference

Rolling in the deep

The bathing machine is back but with a difference
Part-privatised tests, new age limits, driverless cars: Tories plot motoring revolution

Conservatives plot a motoring revolution

Draft report reveals biggest reform to regulations since driving test introduced in 1935