PEOPLE & BUSINESS

No one expected Sam Chisholm, the recently departed chief executive and managing director of BSkyB, to be absent from the pay TV industry for long. Just weeks after stepping down from the driving seat at the satellite broadcaster, both Mr Chisholm and his deputy, David Chance, have re-emerged- in the Polish television market.

But where Mr Chisholm and Mr Chance spent their time at Rupert Murdoch's satellite business scaring the living daylights out of the British cable companies, they will now sit on the board of the biggest Polish cable television operator, @Entertainment, as non-executive directors.

The company, which is quoted on Nasdaq, has 700,000 customers, and is launching a digital service in April next year, roughly the same time that BSkyB is scheduled to launch its digital satellite service. Bob Fowler, chief executive officer of @Entertainment, said the assistance of the men from the Sky would be "invaluable".

The likes of Cable & Wireless Communications and Telewest Communications, the two largest cable companies in this country, must be pondering whether the dynamic duo could be tempted with a similar board position in the UK. After all, both men have an enviable reputation for turning around ailing businesses.

Another time-honoured tradition bites the dust. Jeremy Pope is scrapping the division between voting and non-voting shares in Eldridge, Pope, which his father Phillip Pope introduced into the family pub business in 1951. From next year holders of non-voting shares will have full voting rights, as the company seeks to gain support from a wider, institutional base.

This is quite a step for Mr Pope, the fourth generation in the family, since non-family members haven't had a look-in until now. He describes it as a deck clearing exercise - "so that we're prepared for changes in the market."

His father, like Jeremy a lawyer, split the shares in two 40 years ago in order to allow various members of the family to raise some cash by selling non-voting shares, while retaining control. The company has got out of its original brewing business and now concentrates on developing pubs. Its three main brands are Fireside Inns, Bar Excellence and Slurping Toad. And now, not only can you invest in them, you can control them, too.

London Business School has plucked Professor John A Quelch from Harvard University to succeed its current principal Professor George Bain, who is going off to tell the Government all about the minimum wage.

The new man at the LBS is actually a Brit. Mr Quelch was born in London in 1951 and graduated from Exeter College, Oxford with a degree in history in 1972. He's been at Harvard in some shape or form since 1977, and is currently the Sebastian S Kresge Professor of Marketing. Lord Sainsbury of Turville, chairman of LBS's governing body, describes him as "the ideal man to lead the school."

If you're looking for a stocking filler for a loved one, how about Robert Alexander's racy new book, The Voice of the People: A Constitution for Tomorrow. OK, NatWest Group's chairman Lord Alexander hasn't turned out a bodice-ripper, exactly, but it's all worthy stuff, and probably played its part in getting the barrister-turned-banker on to Roy Jenkins's working party on constitutional reform this week. A NatWest spokesman tells me that since the tome's publication two months ago sales have gone quite well.

Just one thing occurs to me. NatWest has this year dropped around pounds 600m on its investment banking operations, which it finally sold yesterday. Shouldn't Lord A have spent less time authoring and more time auditing?

As the late Roy Castle used to say, Jem Miller is a RECORD BREAKER. The jovial spin doctor retired last Friday from Lowe Bell Financial, although he will continue as a consultant for the firm.

Over his career Mr Miller spent 26 years representing Tate & Lyle, which many consider to be the longest ever PR account in the City. Any challengers? He has also represented Highland Distilleries since the mists of time.

Piers Pottinger, chairman of Lowe Bell Financial, says the firm will continue to present the annual "Jem Miller Award for most spectacular behaviour at a Christmas party."

One distinguished former employee won it for "taking a taxi home from the office party to the house he moved out of four years before," says Mr Pottinger. Jem originally won the prize many years ago for "cossack dancing at Cliveden (the posh Thames Valley hotel) in the most spectacular fashion," he adds.

Mr Miller, a native of Zimbabwe, is celebrating his retirement by buying a house in the South of France.

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
PROMOTED VIDEO
ebooks
ebooksA special investigation by Andy McSmith
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs Money & Business

Recruitment Genius: Software Development Manager

£40000 - £50000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This is an exciting opportunity...

Ashdown Group: Product Manager - (Product Marketing, Financial Services)

£30000 - £35000 per annum + Benefits: Ashdown Group: Marketing Manager - Marke...

Recruitment Genius: Compliance Assistant

£13000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: This Pension Specialist was established ...

Ashdown Group: Market Research Executive

£23000 - £26000 per annum + Benefits: Ashdown Group: Market Research Executive...

Day In a Page

As in 1942, Germany must show restraint over Greece

As in 1942, Germany must show restraint over Greece

Mussolini tried to warn his ally of the danger of bringing the country to its knees. So should we, says Patrick Cockburn
Britain's widening poverty gap should be causing outrage at the start of the election campaign

The short stroll that should be our walk of shame

Courting the global elite has failed to benefit Britain, as the vast disparity in wealth on display in the capital shows
Homeless Veterans appeal: The rise of the working poor: when having a job cannot prevent poverty

Homeless Veterans appeal

The rise of the working poor: when having a job cannot prevent poverty
Prince Charles the saviour of the nation? A new book highlights concerns about how political he will be when he eventually becomes king

Prince Charles the saviour of the nation?

A new book highlights concerns about how political he will be when he eventually becomes king
How books can defeat Isis: Patrick Cockburn was able to update his agenda-setting 'The Rise of Islamic State' while under attack in Baghdad

How books can defeat Isis

Patrick Cockburn was able to update his agenda-setting 'The Rise of Islamic State' while under attack in Baghdad
Judith Hackitt: The myths of elf 'n' safety

Judith Hackitt: The myths of elf 'n' safety

She may be in charge of minimising our risks of injury, but the chair of the Health and Safety Executive still wants children to be able to hurt themselves
The open loathing between Barack Obama and Benjamin Netanyahu just got worse

The open loathing between Obama and Netanyahu just got worse

The Israeli PM's relationship with the Obama has always been chilly, but going over the President's head on Iran will do him no favours, says Rupert Cornwell
French chefs get 'le huff' as nation slips down global cuisine rankings

French chefs get 'le huff' as nation slips down global cuisine rankings

Fury at British best restaurants survey sees French magazine produce a rival list
Star choreographer Matthew Bourne gives young carers a chance to perform at Sadler's Wells

Young carers to make dance debut

What happened when superstar choreographer Matthew Bourne encouraged 27 teenage carers to think about themselves for once?
Design Council's 70th anniversary: Four of the most intriguing prototypes from Ones to Watch

Design Council's 70th anniversary

Four of the most intriguing prototypes from Ones to Watch
Dame Harriet Walter: The actress on learning what it is to age, plastic surgery, and her unease at being honoured by the establishment

Dame Harriet Walter interview

The actress on learning what it is to age, plastic surgery, and her unease at being honoured by the establishment
Art should not be a slave to the ideas driving it

Art should not be a slave to the ideas driving it

Critics of Tom Stoppard's new play seem to agree that cerebral can never trump character, says DJ Taylor
Bill Granger recipes: Our chef's winter salads will make you feel energised through February

Bill Granger's winter salads

Salads aren't just a bit on the side, says our chef - their crunch, colour and natural goodness are perfect for a midwinter pick-me-up
England vs Wales: Cool head George Ford ready to put out dragon fire

George Ford: Cool head ready to put out dragon fire

No 10’s calmness under pressure will be key for England in Cardiff
Michael Calvin: Time for Old Firm to put aside bigotry and forge new links

Michael Calvin's Last Word

Time for Old Firm to put aside bigotry and forge new links