Dalloway Terrace, restaurant review: Eat, drink and be Hygge

Just as sunny rooftops were the highlight of the summer, winter themed terraces, restaurants and lodges form a comforting and warm escape 

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The Independent Online

The association with Virginia Woolf’s Mrs Dalloway is perhaps a little misplaced for The Bloomsbury’s Dalloway Terrace, despite the obvious literary connection. In the novel, the rather dull woman plans a party for that evening, which drags out over an entire novel. But the terrace is a mesmerising space that epitomises the current Danish trend of Hygge – where comfort, relaxation and warmth are at its core.

Inside, it’s more like stepping into the depths of Narnia than just off Great Russell Street. The narrow  terrace, which has been winter-proofed, with a clear covering, encapsulating the terrace from the elements and complete with heaters.

The candle lit room has been decorated with snow-dusted white and wintery foliage that climbs the walls and hangs from the ceiling, with small lights entwined among huge pinecones.

And each seat is draped in a faux-fur skin, and you’ll be given a blanket too – and even a hot water bottle - for the ultimate ski-chalet feel. It’s charming and wonderfully pretty.

The theme isn’t forgotten when it comes to the drinks either as their signature mix is the Mrs Dalloway, a concoction of champagne, Courvoisier, Angostura bitters and sugar.

The rest of the drinks list is just as impressive with the likes of the green Pisco pear sours tinged with pistachio and the sweet and bitter Raspberry Russell. But the most interesting cocktail is the chocolate orange; a liquid delight version of the Terry’s chocolate ball, and a must try for chocolate lovers.

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Pisco pear sours is made up of pear and pineapple infused pisco, pressed lemon, pistachio and pear syrup, egg white and angostura bitters

As part of The Bloomsbury hotel, expect a high level of service and plenty of British favourites on the all day dining menu, from fish and chips to rabbit stew, with other influences including European from steak tartar and hints of Japanese in the miso cod. Each day has an assigned daily special dishes from crayfish mac and cheese to grilled poussin. 

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The East Sussex game pie

Their signature brown Guinness bread is dark and rich and best topped with better, and the best out of the soda and sourdough trio basket. From the starters, the pig chees are lightly battered and matched with a tarragon sauce smeared underneath while the lobster bisque from the specials menu is creamy and rich in flavour. 

The mains are well directed at meat and fish eaters, with little room for vegetarians – bar the risotto the waiter recommended. The game pie is encased in its own delicate pastry casing, with plenty of tender meat and sweet potatoes. I chose the black valley lamb cutlets; a trio of large cuts with a rich champ – ab Irish version of mashed potato with spring onions – and roasted vine tomatoes, which made my side order of cauliflower cheese slightly redundant. There’s a grill menu with dishes including dover sole and tiger prawns as well as salads including with a nod to the latest food trends of super foods and classics like Caesar salad. 

In true alpine spirit, there’s a chocolate fondue, served in a mini La Creuset dish atop a little flame filled with white chocolate and a side dish of fruit and a fondue stick to dip them in with. Others include sweeter dishes like apple crumble or a savoury cheeseboard.

The setting is the main attraction, and the simple British dishes come in second, but a close one at that. With all the components of a fine dining in a chalet in central London - eat, drink and be Hygge. 

Three courses with bread and sides and drinks comes to around £110.

The Dalloway Terrace, The Bloomsbury, 16-22 Great Russell St, Fitzrovia, London WC1B 3NN; dallowayterrace.com; open daily 11am-11pm 

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