ATL union criticises regional teacher pay plan

 

Plans to introduce regional pay for public-sector workers risk discriminating against older teachers and those working in primary schools, a union warned today.

The proposals will leave schools, especially those in deprived areas, struggling to recruit top staff and reduce teachers' salaries, according to the Association of Teachers and Lecturers (ATL).

More than half of teachers (53%) believe a move to regional pay rates would lead to discrimination on grounds of age while the same proportion said it would lead to salaries being linked to the age of children taught, with primary-school teachers receiving less, according to a survey conducted by the union.

Nearly two-thirds (62%) said that teachers will be discriminated against depending on the subject they teach - with those who do not teach maths, English or science losing out.

The survey was published as delegates at ATL's annual conference in Manchester passed a resolution raising concerns over the Government's bid to reduce the role of the School Teachers' Review Body (STRB) - which currently deals with pay and conditions - and move to regional rates.

It said that ATL should "defend robustly" existing national pay structures for the teaching profession.

Proposing the motion, Ralph Surman, of the ATL executive committee, indicated that the proposals could lead to fresh industrial action.

He said: "This issue around local pay, we've already heard, it's going to be the next really big challenge to all of us, and it could end up in dispute. That's the reality of all of this."

Kim Knappett, of Forest Hill School in London and also a member of ATL's executive committee, seconding the motion, said teachers are going to be "up for grabs".

"Regional pay, local rates, all it will do is reduce the pay for the many and not really even benefit a few. This will reduce the salary of teachers where they think they can get away with it," Ms Knappett added.

ATL's survey, which questioned almost 800 teachers, lecturers, heads and principals in UK schools and colleges, found that about three-quarters (76%) of those questioned said pay should not be at the discretion of a school or college head or governing body.

A head of department at a secondary academy in Liverpool told the survey: "Experienced, older staff would be discriminated against in favour of newly qualified teachers and less expensive staff."

A primary teacher in Bradford said: "The current system is fair - no matter where you work or move to you know what you will be paid.

"If it is at the head's discretion, people will be paid differently in different schools for doing the same job, which shouldn't happen.

"It could also lead to heads trying to outbid each other for the best teachers, leading to over-inflated pay budgets for schools."

A member of the leadership group who works in a secondary school and further education in Nottinghamshire said: "Moving away from the national pay scale will lead to shortage subject teachers, particularly maths as well as English teachers being paid more even though they will teach the same level, with same class sizes."

Speaking last week, ATL general secretary Dr Mary Bousted said the union will give evidence to the STRB, which has been asked by ministers to look at how regional pay could be introduced.

She said there is currently a national pay system for teachers with four pay bands - inner London, outer London, the London fringe, which includes parts of the home counties, and the rest of England and Wales.

"We would rather keep the current banding system than have a free-for-all with schools setting pay school by school," Dr Bousted said.

A DfE Spokesperson said: “Schools cannot solve all problems. It is clear though, that a lot of schools haven’t properly addressed poor performance. Union leaders should be challenging underperformance in our schools on behalf of their members, rather than defending a culture of underachievement. The public and many teachers in the country will be confused that Union leaders dislike the idea of schools being given the freedom to pay good teachers more.

 “We are making more money available for schools to support disadvantaged children with the pupil premium. The previous funding system simply didn’t work. We have reformed it so that thousands of children will finally be getting the extra support they need to succeed.”

PA

Life and Style
Social media users in Mexico who commented on cartel violence have been killed in the past
techTweets not showing up or loading this morning, users say
Sport
premier leagueLive: All the latest news and scores from today's matches
News
newsMcKamey Manor says 'there is no escape until the tour is completed'
News
politics
PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
News
ebooksAn unforgettable anthology of contemporary reportage
Sport
Fans of Dulwich Hamlet FC at their ground Champion Hill
footballFans are rejecting the £2,000 season tickets, officious stewarding, and airline-stadium sponsorship
News
Shami Chakrabarti
people
Arts and Entertainment
Benedict Cumberbatch has refused to deny his involvement in the upcoming new Star Wars film
filmBenedict Cumberbatch reignites Star Wars 7 rumours
Sport
football
News
news
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs Education

Maths Teacher

£110 - £200 per day: Randstad Education Leeds: Secondary Maths Teacher for spe...

Senior Research Fellow in Gender, Food and Resilient Communities

£47,334 - £59,058 per annum: Coventry University: The Centre for Agroecology, ...

Senior Research Fellow in Water and Resilient communities

£47,334 - £59,058 per annum: Coventry University: Our team of leading academic...

SEN Teaching Assistant

£60 - £70 per day: Randstad Education Leeds: Special Needs Teaching Assistants...

Day In a Page

Wilko Johnson, now the bad news: musician splits with manager after police investigate assault claims

Wilko Johnson, now the bad news

Former Dr Feelgood splits with manager after police investigate assault claims
Mark Udall: The Democrat Senator with a fight on his hands ahead of the US midterm elections

Mark Udall: The Democrat Senator with a fight on his hands

The Senator for Colorado is for gay rights, for abortion rights – and in the Republicans’ sights as they threaten to take control of the Senate next month
New discoveries show more contact between far-flung prehistoric humans than had been thought

New discoveries show more contact between far-flung prehistoric humans than had been thought

Evidence found of contact between Easter Islanders and South America
Cerys Matthews reveals how her uncle taped 150 interviews for a biography of Dylan Thomas

Cerys Matthews on Dylan Thomas

The singer reveals how her uncle taped 150 interviews for a biography of the famous Welsh poet
DIY is not fun and we've finally realised this as a nation

Homebase closures: 'DIY is not fun'

Homebase has announced the closure of one in four of its stores. Nick Harding, who never did know his awl from his elbow, is glad to see the back of DIY
The Battle of the Five Armies: Air New Zealand releases new Hobbit-inspired in-flight video

Air New Zealand's wizard in-flight video

The airline has released a new Hobbit-inspired clip dubbed "The most epic safety video ever made"
Pumpkin spice is the flavour of the month - but can you stomach the sweetness?

Pumpkin spice is the flavour of the month

The combination of cinnamon, clove, nutmeg (and no actual pumpkin), now flavours everything from lattes to cream cheese in the US
11 best sonic skincare brushes

11 best sonic skincare brushes

Forget the flannel - take skincare to the next level by using your favourite cleanser with a sonic facial brush
Paul Scholes column: I'm not worried about Manchester United's defence - Chelsea test can be the making of Phil Jones and Marcos Rojo

Paul Scholes column

I'm not worried about Manchester United's defence - Chelsea test can be the making of Jones and Rojo
Frank Warren: Boxing has its problems but in all my time I've never seen a crooked fight

Frank Warren: Boxing has its problems but in all my time I've never seen a crooked fight

While other sports are stalked by corruption, we are an easy target for the critics
Jamie Roberts exclusive interview: 'I'm a man of my word – I'll stay in Paris'

Jamie Roberts: 'I'm a man of my word – I'll stay in Paris'

Wales centre says he’s not coming home but is looking to establish himself at Racing Métro
How could three tourists have been battered within an inch of their lives by a burglar in a plush London hotel?

A crime that reveals London's dark heart

How could three tourists have been battered within an inch of their lives by a burglar in a plush London hotel?
Meet 'Porridge' and 'Vampire': Chinese state TV is offering advice for citizens picking a Western moniker

Lost in translation: Western monikers

Chinese state TV is offering advice for citizens picking a Western moniker. Simon Usborne, who met a 'Porridge' and a 'Vampire' while in China, can see the problem
Handy hacks that make life easier: New book reveals how to rid your inbox of spam, protect your passwords and amplify your iPhone

Handy hacks that make life easier

New book reveals how to rid your email inbox of spam, protect your passwords and amplify your iPhone with a loo-roll
KidZania lets children try their hands at being a firefighter, doctor or factory worker for the day

KidZania: It's a small world

The new 'educational entertainment experience' in London's Shepherd's Bush will allow children to try out the jobs that are usually undertaken by adults, including firefighter, doctor or factory worker