Ah-ha! Coogan takes on role as angry ex-roadie

He is best known for his alter ego as a cheesy chat show host, but in his latest comedy, Steve Coogan will take on the persona of an angry ex-roadie.

In the new BBC2 comedy, Saxondale, Coogan will play a man with anger management issues and his own pest control business in Stevenage. It is a far cry from Alan Partridge, the Norwich-based television presenter, whose original show title was lifted from the Abba song, "Knowing Me, Knowing You".

His character, Tommy Saxondale, has recently been through a hostile divorce and now lives with his girlfriend Magz, who runs an anarchic T-shirt shop called Smash the System.

According to BBC programme publicity, "Tommy regards himself as a maverick and a free thinker ... but as well as Pharaoh Ants, mice and moths, Tommy also has to battle with snowboarders, pigeon lovers and people who talk about house prices."

Coogan said: "The joke with Partridge was always at Alan's expense, whereas Tom is genuinely witty ... while still being a bit of a dick."

The BBC has commissioned seven half-hour episodes of the comedy from Baby Cow, Coogan's independent production company. Scenes will include Saxondale having his eyesight improved by a prostitute, almost befriending a celebrity, knee-capping an annoying hippy and experimenting with women's make-up.

Lucy Lumsden, head of comedy commissioning for the BBC, said: "Steve's created a wonderful character in Tommy, an ex-roadie turned pest controller with some serious anger issues."

Saxondale, co-written by Coogan and Neil Maclennan, will also star Ruth Jones, of Nighty Night and Little Britain, as Magz, and The Rotters' Club actor Rasmus Hardiker as naïve assistant Raymond. There will be guest appearances from Morwenna Banks, Alexander Armstrong and Liza Tarbuck.

Last month it emerged that Coogan had put on hold plans for Alan Partridge: The Movie, which he was co-writing with Patrick Marber, which is said to feature an al-Qa'ida siege.

Coogan has several big screen credits to his name, including Michael Winterbottom's recent film A Cock And Bull Story, where he appeared with Rob Brydon in an intricate plot about actors making a movie of Laurence Sterne's "unfilmable" novel, Tristram Shandy.

He also starred in Winterbottom's 24 Hour Party People as the Manchester music impresario Anthony H Wilson and played Phileas Fogg in Around The World In 80 Days. Trained at what was then Manchester Polytechnic's School of Theatre, the comedian launched Alan Partridge in the Radio 4 show Knowing Me, Knowing You in 1992. He was given his own television show in 1995, which later became I'm Alan Partridge.

At the same time, he played a series of comic characters including low lifer Paul Calf and crooner Tony Ferrino in the sketch show Coogan's Run.

In 1999, Coogan set up Baby Cow with Henry Normal, whose credits include The Fast Show and The Royle Family. Baby Cow was responsible for making Brydon famous in Human Remains and Marion and Geoff and also produced Julia Davis's award-winning comedy Nighty Night.

News
people'It can last and it's terrifying'
Sport
Radamel Falcao
footballManchester United agree loan deal for Monaco striker Falcao
Sport
Louis van Gaal, Radamel Falcao, Arturo Vidal, Mats Hummels and Javier Hernandez
footballFalcao, Hernandez, Welbeck and every deal live as it happens
Sport
footballFeaturing Bart Simpson
PROMOTED VIDEO
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
News
ebooksAn unforgettable anthology of contemporary reportage
News
peopleA spokesperson said the support group was 'extremely disappointed'
Voices
A man shoots at targets depicting a portrait of Russian President Vladimir Putin, in a shooting range in the center of the western Ukrainian city of Lviv
voicesIt's cowardice to pretend this is anything other than an invasion
News
i100
Arts and Entertainment
Alex Kapranos of Franz Ferdinand performs live
music Pro-independence show to take place four days before vote
News
news Video - hailed as 'most original' since Benedict Cumberbatch's
Arts and Entertainment
booksNovelist takes aim at Orwell's rules for writing plain English
Arts and Entertainment
The eyes have it: Kate Bush
music
News
i100
Life and Style
tech

Apple agrees deal with Visa on contactless payments

Life and Style
techIf those brochure kitchens look a little too perfect to be true, well, that’s probably because they are
News
i100
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs Media

Marketing Executive / Member Services Exec

£20 - 26k + Benefits: Guru Careers: A Marketing Executive / Member Services Ex...

Trend Writer / Copywriter

£25 - 30k (DOE): Guru Careers: A Trend Writer / Copywriter: Retail, Design and...

Business Development Manager / Media Sales Exec

£28 - 32k + Uncapped Commission: Guru Careers: A Business Development Manager ...

Digital Marketing Assistant

£17 - 27k: Guru Careers: We are seeking a Digital Marketing Assistant to join ...

Day In a Page

Alexander Fury: The designer names to look for at fashion week this season

The big names to look for this fashion week

This week, designers begin to show their spring 2015 collections in New York
Will Self: 'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

'I like Orwell's writing as much as the next talented mediocrity'

Will Self takes aim at Orwell's rules for writing plain English
Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Meet Afghanistan's middle-class paint-ballers

Toy guns proving a popular diversion in a country flooded with the real thing
Al Pacino wows Venice

Al Pacino wows Venice

Ham among the brilliance as actor premieres two films at festival
Neil Lawson Baker interview: ‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.

Neil Lawson Baker interview

‘I’ve gained so much from art. It’s only right to give something back’.
The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

The other Mugabe who is lining up for the Zimbabwean presidency

Wife of President Robert Mugabe appears to have her sights set on succeeding her husband
The model of a gadget launch: Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed

The model for a gadget launch

Cultivate an atmosphere of mystery and excitement to sell stuff people didn't realise they needed
Alice Roberts: She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

She's done pretty well, for a boffin without a beard

Alice Roberts talks about her new book on evolution - and why her early TV work drew flak from (mostly male) colleagues
Get well soon, Joan Rivers - an inspiration, whether she likes it or not

Get well soon, Joan Rivers

She is awful. But she's also wonderful, not in spite of but because of the fact she's forever saying appalling things, argues Ellen E Jones
Doctor Who Into the Dalek review: A classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster

A fresh take on an old foe

Doctor Who Into the Dalek more than compensated for last week's nonsensical offering
Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

Fashion walks away from the celebrity runway show

As the collections start, fashion editor Alexander Fury finds video and the internet are proving more attractive
Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy

Meet the stars of TV's Wolf Hall...

... and it's not the cast of the Tudor trilogy
Weekend at the Asylum: Europe's biggest steampunk convention heads to Lincoln

Europe's biggest steampunk convention

Jake Wallis Simons discovers how Victorian ray guns and the martial art of biscuit dunking are precisely what the 21st century needs
Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Don't swallow the tripe – a user's guide to weasel words

Lying is dangerous and unnecessary. A new book explains the strategies needed to avoid it. John Rentoul on the art of 'uncommunication'
Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough? Was the beloved thespian the last of the cross-generation stars?

Daddy, who was Richard Attenborough?

The atomisation of culture means that few of those we regard as stars are universally loved any more, says DJ Taylor