Amazon chief Jeff Bezos buys Washington Post: Newspaper timeline

 

1877: The Washington Post is founded by Democrat representative Stilson Hutchins on December 6 with an initial circulation of 10,000.

1880: The paper adds a Sunday edition, becoming DC’s first newspaper to publish seven days a week.

1889: United States Marine Band leader John Philip Sousa premieres the song “The Washington Post March” - a marching band favourite to this day.

1889-1916: The Washington Post passes through a series of owners, either by sale or inheritance. When John McLean dies in 1916, he puts the newspaper in trust for fear that his wayward son Edward “Ned” McLean will bring about its demise. Ned challenges the trust in court and is given control of paper. Under his management, it goes into decline.

1933: At a public bankruptcy auction held on the steps of The Washington Post’s building, the newspaper is sold for $825,000 to Eugene Meyer, a Californian financier. Over the next decade, circulation triples to 162,000.

1936: Journalist Felix Morley wins The Post its first Pulitzer Prize “for distinguished editorial writing during the year.”

1946: Following the Second World War, President Truman appoints Meyer the first president of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development. He is succeeded at The Washington Post’s helm by Philip L. Graham, husband to his daughter Katharine Meyer Graham.

1950: The newspaper grows and to accommodate it, Graham builds a $6 million plant in Washington complete with up-to-date presses.

1953: The Washington Post Company purchases television station WMBR in Jacksonville, FL – the first of many.

1954-1973: After acquiring its rival the Washington Times-Herald, the paper changes its name to The Washington Post and Times-Herald for this period.

1961: Graham purchases Newsweek magazine for The Washington Post Company.

1963: Graham dies and control of The Washington Post passes to his wife Katharine Graham, at a time when there are few women in the upper echelons of the industry. On her father’s original decision to hand control of the newspaper to her husband in 1946, she later wrote: “it never crossed my mind that he might have viewed me as someone to take on an important job at the paper.“

1971: Until now privately-owned, The Washington Post Company goes public, with the sale of Class B common stock for $26 a share.

1972: Executive editor Ben Bradlee stakes the newspaper’s reputation and resources on reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein. In a series of lengthy articles, they uncover the story behind a break-in at the Democratic National Committee offices in the Watergate Hotel complex in Washington. Their reportage ultimately plays a part in President Nixon’s resignation and wins the newspaper the Pulitzer Prize in 1973.

1977: The Washington Post Company sells its last remaining radio station, of which it once owned a handful.

1980: Reporter Janet Cookewon wins acclaim and a Pulitzer Prize for a piece called “Jimmy’s World”, charting the life of an eight-year heroin addict in Washington.

1996: The newspaper launches a website, washingtonpost.com. Two years later it publishes 11 years of archives online.

2008: The Washington Post wins six Pulitzer Prizes for - amongst other topics - coverage of the massacre at Virginia Tech, poor care at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, and Vice President Cheney's behind-the-scenes power.

2012: Newsweek announces it will cease print publication at the end of the year, only existing thereafter in a digital form.

2013: The newspaper announces plans to start charging frequent users of its website.

August 5 - Announces sale to Amazon founder Jeff Bezos in £163m deal.

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
Sport
England's women celebrate after their 3rd place play-off win against Germany
Women's World CupFara Williams converts penalty to secure victory and bronze medals
Arts and Entertainment
Ricardo by Edward Sutcliffe, 2014
artPortraits of LA cricketers from notorious suburb go on display
News
newsHillary Clinton comments on viral Humans of New York photo of gay teenager
Arts and Entertainment
The gang rape scene in the Royal Opera’s production of Gioachino Rossini’s Guillaume Tell has caused huge controversy
music
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
ebooks
ebooksAn introduction to the ground rules of British democracy
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs Media

Recruitment Genius: B2B Media Sales Professional - Work From Home

£20000 - £50000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Enjoying rapid growth we contin...

Recruitment Genius: B2B Media Sales Professional - Work From Home

£20000 - £50000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Enjoying rapid growth we contin...

Recruitment Genius: B2B Media Sales Professional - Work From Home

£20000 - £50000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Enjoying rapid growth we contin...

Recruitment Genius: B2B Media Sales Professional - Work From Home

£20000 - £50000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Enjoying rapid growth we contin...

Day In a Page

The Greek referendum exposes a gaping hole at the heart of the European Union – its distinct lack of any genuine popular legitimacy

Gaping hole at the heart of the European Union

Treatment of Greece has shown up a lack of genuine legitimacy
Number of young homeless in Britain 'more than three times the official figures'

'Everything changed when I went to the hostel'

Number of young homeless people in Britain is 'more than three times the official figures'
Compton Cricket Club

Compton Cricket Club

Portraits of LA cricketers from notorious suburb to be displayed in London
London now the global money-laundering centre for the drug trade, says crime expert

Wlecome to London, drug money-laundering centre for the world

'Mexico is its heart and London is its head'
The Buddhist temple minutes from Centre Court that helps a winner keep on winning

The Buddhist temple minutes from Centre Court

It helps a winner keep on winning
Is this the future of flying: battery-powered planes made of plastic, and without flight decks?

Is this the future of flying?

Battery-powered planes made of plastic, and without flight decks
Isis are barbarians – but the Caliphate is a dream at the heart of all Muslim traditions

Isis are barbarians

but the Caliphate is an ancient Muslim ideal
The Brink's-Mat curse strikes again: three tons of stolen gold that brought only grief

Curse of Brink's Mat strikes again

Death of John 'Goldfinger' Palmer the latest killing related to 1983 heist
Greece debt crisis: 'The ministers talk to us about miracles' – why Greeks are cynical ahead of the bailout referendum

'The ministers talk to us about miracles'

Why Greeks are cynical ahead of the bailout referendum
Call of the wild: How science is learning to decode the way animals communicate

Call of the wild

How science is learning to decode the way animals communicate
Greece debt crisis: What happened to democracy when it’s a case of 'Vote Yes or else'?

'The economic collapse has happened. What is at risk now is democracy...'

If it doesn’t work in Europe, how is it supposed to work in India or the Middle East, asks Robert Fisk
The science of swearing: What lies behind the use of four-letter words?

The science of swearing

What lies behind the use of four-letter words?
The Real Stories of Migrant Britain: Clive fled from Zimbabwe - now it won't have him back

The Real Stories of Migrant Britain

Clive fled from Zimbabwe - now it won’t have him back
Africa on the menu: Three foodie friends want to popularise dishes from the continent

Africa on the menu

Three foodie friends want to popularise dishes from the hot new continent
Donna Karan is stepping down after 30 years - so who will fill the DKNY creator's boots?

Who will fill Donna Karan's boots?

The designer is stepping down as Chief Designer of DKNY after 30 years. Alexander Fury looks back at the career of 'America's Chanel'