Just what the 50-plus male golfer needs: A new monthly called Calibre featuring Top Gear's James May

Top Gear’s James May is the cover star for a new magazine aimed at affluent middle-aged men

Meda Editor

The golf club might have a new bible. It comes in the shape of a magazine aimed at the “often-overlooked” demographic of the wealthy 50-plus male.

The pin-up boy for Calibre is the Top Gear presenter James May, which the magazine describes as “an excellent ambassador for this affluent, sophisticated and intelligent demographic”.

In the launch edition, on sale from 1 May, the BBC petrol head – who is described as a “pub philosopher” and interviewed in a local hostelry - provides an “intimate” interview in which he talks about his lifestyle and gives his views on “what it really means to be a bloke in in his Fifties”.

Calibre sets out its stall with a decidedly county feel, promising to put the Range Rover Freelander 2 “through its paces” and offering readers the chance to win a Barbour jacket. Calibre man may well be unaware that such waxed garments have more recently been adopted as the uniform of young urban hipsters.

Sport will be covered in the form of features on the Isle of Man TT, the Goodwood Test of Speed – and golf. Columnists include Gill Wadsworth, a pensions and investments specialists, and City analyst Angus Campbell. There are regular columns on wine and whisky.

If you are the type of middle-aged man who Radio 1 is desperately trying to disown as a listener then it’s probably safe to say that Calibre is not for you.

There is a touch of the Victor Meldrews about this new arrival to the 21 century newsstand. Its “flagship regular feature” has the cantankerous title “12 Angry Men” and “asks a panel of 12 readers for their honest opinions on contemporary issues”. Harrumph.

James May's book
Publisher James Hurst said that the “12 Angry Men” feature was inspired by the 1957 Henry Fonda film of that name and that Calibre’s first reader jury would be addressing the thorny subject of marriage and divorce. Future issues will focus on the topics of the National Health Service and immigration.

Mr Hurst said that well-off 50-plus British males “tend to feel marginalised in society” and, although he accepted that they often also wield power, argued that the demographic was frequently ignored by both media companies and advertisers. He said that men’s magazines, such as GQ and Esquire, were pitched at young men and placed an emphasis on fashion.

Calibre does not regard the Internet as a dangerous modern invention and Mr Hurst said the magazine would have a digital edition and promote itself on social media.

But he argued: “Whether it’s a book, a newspaper or a magazine, the over-50s still adore print publications rather than e-zines or apps.”

Calibre, which is edited by Barnaby Dracup and begins with a 60,000 print run, will sell at £4.99 and donate 5 per cent of its profits to the Prostate Cancer Research Centre.

In addition to being sold in newsagents, it will be distributed through luxury hotels, private members clubs - and golf clubs.

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
News
ebookA unique anthology of reporting and analysis of a crucial period of history
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs Media

Guru Careers: Software Developer / C# Developer

£40-50K: Guru Careers: We are seeking an experienced Software / C# Developer w...

Guru Careers: Software Developer

£35 - 40k + Benefits: Guru Careers: We are seeking a Software Developer (JavaS...

Guru Careers: Senior Account Manager / SAM

£30 - 35k: Guru Careers: A Senior Account Manager / SAM is needed to join the ...

Ashdown Group: Digital Marketing Manager (EMEA) - City, London

£55000 - £65000 per annum + Benefits: Ashdown Group: Digital Marketing Manager...

Day In a Page

Sun, sex and an anthropological study: One British academic's summer of hell in Magaluf

Sun, sex and an anthropological study

One academic’s summer of hell in Magaluf
From Shakespeare to Rising Damp... to Vicious

Frances de la Tour's 50-year triumph

'Rising Damp' brought De la Tour such recognition that she could be forgiven if she'd never been able to move on. But at 70, she continues to flourish - and to beguile
'That Whitsun, I was late getting away...'

Ian McMillan on the Whitsun Weddings

This weekend is Whitsun, and while the festival may no longer resonate, Larkin's best-loved poem, lives on - along with the train journey at the heart of it
Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath in a new light

Songs from the bell jar

Kathryn Williams explores the works and influences of Sylvia Plath
How one man's day in high heels showed him that Cannes must change its 'no flats' policy

One man's day in high heels

...showed him that Cannes must change its 'flats' policy
Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Is a quiet crusade to reform executive pay bearing fruit?

Dominic Rossi of Fidelity says his pressure on business to control rewards is working. But why aren’t other fund managers helping?
The King David Hotel gives precious work to Palestinians - unless peace talks are on

King David Hotel: Palestinians not included

The King David is special to Jerusalem. Nick Kochan checked in and discovered it has some special arrangements, too
More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years

End of the Aussie brain drain

More people moving from Australia to New Zealand than in the other direction for first time in 24 years
Meditation is touted as a cure for mental instability but can it actually be bad for you?

Can meditation be bad for you?

Researching a mass murder, Dr Miguel Farias discovered that, far from bringing inner peace, meditation can leave devotees in pieces
Eurovision 2015: Australians will be cheering on their first-ever entrant this Saturday

Australia's first-ever Eurovision entrant

Australia, a nation of kitsch-worshippers, has always loved the Eurovision Song Contest. Maggie Alderson says it'll fit in fine
Letterman's final Late Show: Laughter, but no tears, as David takes his bow after 33 years

Laughter, but no tears, as Letterman takes his bow after 33 years

Veteran talkshow host steps down to plaudits from four presidents
Ivor Novello Awards 2015: Hozier wins with anti-Catholic song 'Take Me To Church' as John Whittingdale leads praise for Black Sabbath

Hozier's 'blasphemous' song takes Novello award

Singer joins Ed Sheeran and Clean Bandit in celebration of the best in British and Irish music
Tequila gold rush: The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product

Join the tequila gold rush

The spirit has gone from a cheap shot to a multi-billion pound product
12 best statement wallpapers

12 best statement wallpapers

Make an impact and transform a room with a conversation-starting pattern
Paul Scholes column: Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?

Paul Scholes column

Does David De Gea really want to leave Manchester United to fight it out for the No 1 spot at Real Madrid?