Charles L. Harness

Unorthodox science-fiction writer

There are reasons for Charles L. Harness's lack of wide acclaim as a writer of science fiction for over 60 years in America. His personal modesty and decent reticence were evident from the very beginning, as he made clear in a late novel, Cybele, With Bluebonnets (2002), a fantasy which (almost secretly) also serves as a shadow autobiography of his early years. Science fiction itself was a byline; he worked full-time as a lawyer from 1947 until 1981.

There were other reasons for his obscurity, despite a cadre of devoted readers, who lauded him for decades. Most of his early advocates were British rather than American, which did not help. Each of his 14 books differed significantly from its siblings, and some of them were very challenging, all of which led to a disjointed career; over the course of that career, Harness required 10 separate publishers to get those 14 titles into the world.

But fame was clearly not important. The pages of Cybele reveal an open-hearted, quiet, loving young man who did not want to become conspicuous; and his later years progressed in line with his ambitions. He worked for the American government for a decade before joining American Cyanamid in 1947 as a patent attorney; from 1953 until he retired at 65, he worked in the same capacity for W.R. Grace in Maryland, where he lived until three months before his death, when a severe stroke caused him to return to his family in Kansas. He did not attend science-fiction conventions; he did not mix, except by post.

It is in his writing alone that we detect the complex mind of an author whose influences extended from A.E. Van Vogt to Jean Cocteau. Beginning with "Time Trap" for Astounding Science Fiction in 1948 (he placed another 18 stories with Astounding over a 52-year span), he published a wide range of tales whose sexual awareness and conceptual rigours made him deeply influential upon a number of his fellow writers, like Alfred Bester or Dan Simmons.

He was a master of what Brian W. Aldiss, introducing his work, dubbed the "Widescreen Baroque", the kind of tale which transforms traditional space opera into an arena where a vast array of characters can act their hearts out, where anything can be said with a wink or dead seriously, and any kind of story be told.

Harness's most famous single novel was his first, Flight into Yesterday (1953; later published as The Paradox Men). Here, what initially seems to be a tale dominated by space-opera extravagances, with time travel intersecting with superscience and confusing a cast of aspiring superheroes, gradually turns into a severely articulate narrative analysis of the implications of Arnold J. Toynbee's Study of History, and much else.

In 1953, Harness also published his most famous single story, "The Rose", which first appeared in the UK magazine Authentic, then as the lead novella in a UK mass-market paperback collection. This astonishing tale - which transfigures its source in Oscar Wilde's "The Nightingale and the Rose" into a transcendent paean to the victory of art over the coercions of science - did not appear in the United States until 1969.

This may not have been unexpected: its protagonist is a woman, who is fatally ill of a deforming disease, and who is a creative artist to book; and she wins. But it is clearly possible that the American science-fiction community's disdain for this hugely challenging tale discouraged Harness, who was fully involved in his career at this point, with two small children to raise. Certainly he stopped publishing for more than a decade.

Fortunately, however, he returned to active writing with clever, unorthodox novels like The Ring of Ritornel (1968), Wolfhead (1978) and The Venetian Court (1986). Late in his life, two large retrospective collections - An Ornament to His Profession (1998) and Rings (2000) - began to focus readers' attention on one of the secret masters of the genre. But he had always been there.

John Clute

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
  • Get to the point
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs General

Recruitment Genius: Photographer / Floorplanner / Domestic Energy Assessor

£16000 - £25000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: A Photographer/ Floor planner /...

Ashdown Group: Front-End Developer - Surrey - £40,000

£30000 - £40000 per annum: Ashdown Group: Front-End Developer - Guildford/Craw...

Recruitment Genius: Customer Service Assistant

£13500 - £15000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: A Customer Service Assistant is...

Recruitment Genius: Sales Executive - OTE £35,000

£16000 - £35000 per annum: Recruitment Genius: An ambitious and motivated Sale...

Day In a Page

Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

Not even the 'putrid throat' could stop the Ross Poldark swoon-fest'

How a costume drama became a Sunday night staple
Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers as he pushes Tories on housing

Miliband promises no stamp duty for first-time buyers

Labour leader pushes Tories on housing
Aviation history is littered with grand failures - from the the Bristol Brabazon to Concorde - but what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?

Aviation history is littered with grand failures

But what went wrong with the SuperJumbo?
Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of Soviet-style 'iron curtains' right across Europe

Fortress Europe?

Fear of Putin, Islamists and immigration is giving rise to a new generation of 'iron curtains'
Never mind what you're wearing, it's what you're reclining on

Never mind what you're wearing

It's what you're reclining on that matters
General Election 2015: Chuka Umunna on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband

Chuka Umunna: A virus of racism runs through Ukip

The shadow business secretary on the benefits of immigration, humility – and his leader Ed Miliband
Yemen crisis: This exotic war will soon become Europe's problem

Yemen's exotic war will soon affect Europe

Terrorism and boatloads of desperate migrants will be the outcome of the Saudi air campaign, says Patrick Cockburn
Marginal Streets project aims to document voters in the run-up to the General Election

Marginal Streets project documents voters

Independent photographers Joseph Fox and Orlando Gili are uploading two portraits of constituents to their website for each day of the campaign
Game of Thrones: Visit the real-life kingdom of Westeros to see where violent history ends and telly tourism begins

The real-life kingdom of Westeros

Is there something a little uncomfortable about Game of Thrones shooting in Northern Ireland?
How to survive a social-media mauling, by the tough women of Twitter

How to survive a Twitter mauling

Mary Beard, Caroline Criado-Perez, Louise Mensch, Bunny La Roche and Courtney Barrasford reveal how to trounce the trolls
Gallipoli centenary: At dawn, the young remember the young who perished in one of the First World War's bloodiest battles

At dawn, the young remember the young

A century ago, soldiers of the Empire – many no more than boys – spilt on to Gallipoli’s beaches. On this 100th Anzac Day, there are personal, poetic tributes to their sacrifice
Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves

Follow the money as never before

Dissent is slowly building against the billions spent on presidential campaigns – even among politicians themselves, reports Rupert Cornwell
Samuel West interview: The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents

Samuel West interview

The actor and director on austerity, unionisation, and not mentioning his famous parents
General Election 2015: Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Imagine if the leading political parties were fashion labels

Fashion editor, Alexander Fury, on what the leaders' appearances tell us about them
Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka: Home can be the unsafest place for women

The architect of the HeForShe movement and head of UN Women on the world's failure to combat domestic violence