Diary: Who'll protect the little ones from Claire Perry's potty mouth?

 

The Tory MP Claire Perry has been the driving force behind a campaign against online pornography. "As a mother with three children I know how difficult it is to keep children from seeing inappropriate material on the internet," she once told the Commons.

Yet this is the same MP who had to apologise to the Speaker John Bercow because when she was frustrated about not being called to speak in a debate, she wondered aloud whether she needed to give him a blow job.

And as a loyal Government supporter, she was so angered on another occasion by the remarks of the anti-EU Tory Douglas Carswell she suggested he should "f**k off and join UKIP".

And this weekend Perry had to be told to mind her language while being interviewed about the banking crisis on Radio 5 Live's breakfast show. She described the culture inside the banks as one of "big swinging dicks".

Parents everywhere will soon be wondering how to protect their little ones from the graphic sexual imagery of Ms Perry.

Cameron steals Osborne's best lines

It must have been galling for George Osborne to have to wait until almost five o'clock yesterday afternoon before he could begin his report to the Commons on the banking scandal, and even more annoying that his Downing Street neighbour had stolen his best lines.

David Cameron, who went first on the grounds of seniority, was supposedly reporting on last week's EU summit, but tacked a bit on to the end of his prepared statement, in which he trailed the main points of what Osborne was going to say later. With a large contingent of Eurosceptic MPs behind him, dissatisfied with his vague promise of a referendum on Britain's EU membership, the Prime Minister needed a diversion, even if it threatened to knock his colleague off the top of the news bulletins.

Serving the people: nice work if you can get

Last month, the Lincolnshire Echo highlighted the case of Sara Cliff, a Tory councillor who had pocketed £23,000 for attending 19 county council meetings, more than £1,200 a meeting. It sounds generous, but actually it is quite modest compared with the contribution of Stephen Padmore, a Labour councillor from New Cross, in south-east London, who has turned up to two meetings in the past 12 months, for which he received £9,812 in allowances. That is nearly £5,000 a meeting. "Councillor Padmore's pay per meeting rivals that of most city bankers," a fellow councillor told the local free sheet, News Shopper.

Second best in the Olympic salmon stakes

Lance Forman, former President of the Cambridge Union, former special adviser to Peter Lilley, when he was a Cabinet minister in John Major's government, and fourth generation salmon smoker, is not best mates with his fellow Tory, Sebastian Coe, and other luminaries of the 2012 Olympics.

The family business, Forman's Fish Island, which has supplied the nation with smoked salmon for generations, was until recently located where the running track in the Olympic stadium now is.

After a long battle which caused Lord Coe some heartache, the business moved to a new factory, 100m away, and was able to advertise itself as the "perfect" venue for parties or conferences because of its views of the stadium. Mr Forman is busy renting 30 temporary suites to companies for a princely £75,000.

Alas, a new pavilion has sprung up. It is run by Prestige Ticketing, official providers of Olympic hospitality, who are offering three- course meals and tickets to the 100m for £4,500, and it is slap bang in the middle of Forman's much advertised vista.

To add insult to injury, at the official opening, smoked salmon canapés were passed round as the Prestige boss, Alan Gilpin, explained: "We're really passionate about food. We want to showcase British produce, locally sourced, artisan made, often by several generations of the same family." The salmon, surely then, must be from Forman's over the road, he was asked.

"Erm, no, it's not actually."

Start your day with The Independent, sign up for daily news emails
PROMOTED VIDEO
ebooks
ebooksA special investigation by Andy McSmith
Latest stories from i100
Have you tried new the Independent Digital Edition apps?
Independent Dating
and  

By clicking 'Search' you
are agreeing to our
Terms of Use.

iJobs Job Widget
iJobs People

Recruitment Genius: Bookkeeper

Negotiable: Recruitment Genius: One of the world's leading suppliers and manuf...

Recruitment Genius: Multiple Apprentices Required

£6240 per annum: Recruitment Genius: Apprentices are required to join a privat...

Sauce Recruitment: HR Manager

£40000 per annum: Sauce Recruitment: This is an exciting opportunity for a HR...

Ashdown Group: Interim HR Manager - 3 Month FTC - Henley-on-Thames

£35000 - £40000 per annum: Ashdown Group: A well-established organisation oper...

Day In a Page

Isis hostage crisis: Militant group stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

Isis stands strong as its numerous enemies fail to find a common plan to defeat it

The jihadis are being squeezed militarily and economically, but there is no sign of an implosion, says Patrick Cockburn
Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action

Virtual reality: Seeing is believing

Virtual reality thrusts viewers into the frontline of global events - and puts film-goers at the heart of the action
Homeless Veterans appeal: MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’

Homeless Veterans appeal

MP says Coalition ‘not doing enough’ to help
Larry David, Steve Coogan and other comedians share stories of depression in new documentary

Comedians share stories of depression

The director of the new documentary, Kevin Pollak, tells Jessica Barrett how he got them to talk
Has The Archers lost the plot with it's spicy storylines?

Has The Archers lost the plot?

A growing number of listeners are voicing their discontent over the rural soap's spicy storylines; so loudly that even the BBC's director-general seems worried, says Simon Kelner
English Heritage adds 14 post-war office buildings to its protected lists

14 office buildings added to protected lists

Christopher Beanland explores the underrated appeal of these palaces of pen-pushing
Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Human skull discovery in Israel proves humans lived side-by-side with Neanderthals

Scientists unearthed the cranial fragments from Manot Cave in West Galilee
World War Z author Max Brooks honours WW1's Harlem Hellfighters in new graphic novel

Max Brooks honours Harlem Hellfighters

The author talks about race, legacy and his Will Smith film option to Tim Walker
Why the league system no longer measures up

League system no longer measures up

Jon Coles, former head of standards at the Department of Education, used to be in charge of school performance rankings. He explains how he would reform the system
Valentine's Day cards: 5 best online card shops

Don't leave it to the petrol station: The best online card shops for Valentine's Day

Can't find a card you like on the high street? Try one of these sites for individual, personalised options, whatever your taste
Diego Costa: Devil in blue who upsets defences is a reminder of what Liverpool have lost

Devil in blue Costa is a reminder of what Liverpool have lost

The Reds are desperately missing Luis Suarez, says Ian Herbert
Ashley Giles: 'I'll watch England – but not as a fan'

Ashley Giles: 'I'll watch England – but not as a fan'

Former one-day coach says he will ‘observe’ their World Cup games – but ‘won’t be jumping up and down’
Greece elections: In times like these, the EU has far more dangerous adversaries than Syriza

Greece elections

In times like these, the EU has far more dangerous adversaries than Syriza, says Patrick Cockburn
Holocaust Memorial Day: Nazi victims remembered as spectre of prejudice reappears

Holocaust Memorial Day

Nazi victims remembered as spectre of prejudice reappears over Europe
Fortitude and the Arctic attraction: Our fascination with the last great wilderness

Magnetic north

The Arctic has always exerted a pull, from Greek myth to new thriller Fortitude. Gerard Gilbert considers what's behind our fascination with the last great wilderness