Katy Perry confirms she eats acupuncture-treated fish in strangest fad since JLo sniffed grapefruit oil

The singer introduces a weird new culinary technique to her many Twitter users

There is such a thing as acupuncture-treated sushi and Katy Perry is proud to say she’s tried it.

Yes acupuncture, the ancient Chinese form of medicine in which needles are inserted into the skin at certain points of the body, also now used on fish and eaten by famous people. The practice is known for relieving back pain.

Perry had her specialist sushi made for her by chef and restaurant owner Antonio Park. She ate it with Neil Patrick Harris and his fiancé David Burtka.

There is little else to say. Except why? Why do fishes need to be treated for acupuncture? Park’s Montreal restaurant website helpfully explains that the technique is actually kinder to the fish. The needles apparently paralyse the animal and renders it “senseless”, thus keeping it fresh (apparently, keeping it chilled in the office fridge isn’t good enough).

 

“Fishermen insert needles so that the trauma of death is avoided, allowing the cut to remain exceptionally tender,” says a description about the process called kaimin katsugyo, which translates as 'live fish sleeping soundly’.

Perry then weirdly shared a picture of herself getting acupuncture as she “got ready” for a Montreal gig. Perhaps she’s trying to understand how the fish feel. Either way, we're not sure paralysing fish sushi will catch on - it's the weirdest fad since JLo began sniffing grapefruit oil with the misplaced hope that the aroma alone might trigger liver enzymes into calorie-burning, detoxifying gear.

For more ridiculous diets adopted by the famous click through the gallery above.

Read more: Katy Perry gatecrashes children's birthday party
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