Kristin Davis 'wishes someone will let me talk about refugees' after awkward Sex And The City skit on Australian TV

The actress replied to a number of sympathetic tweets

Although Sex and the City ended 12 years ago, it seems the sitcom continues to follow Kristin Davis around even when she has plenty more important things to discuss.

The actress has expressed her frustration after being asked to take part in a cringeworthy Sex And The City related skit instead of discussing her charity work with refugees on Australian television.

Davis, who played Charlotte in the cult sitcom from 1998 to 2004, has devoted much of her life to humanitarianism since the series ended. As well as being an Oxfam ambassador and supporter of UNHCR, she has visited refugees in a variety of African countries.

She is currently in Australia to meet with government officials, present a keynote address and discuss her latest mission to the Democratic Republic of Congo and agreed to an interview on morning talk show Sunrise on Thursday.

Aside from a few minutes at the beginning where she stressed the importance of not being “afraid of refugees but afraid for them” the conversation swiftly moved to the actress’s part in Sex And The City before she was asked to partake in a cringeworthy reenactment of the show.

The bizarre sketch saw an uncomfortable looking Davis act as Charlotte while three other presenters, who routinely burst into fits of giggles, played Carrie, Samantha and Miranda.

It wasn’t long before viewers at home were quick to notice how awkward Davis looked and criticised the programme.

Davis was not silent on the matter either and re-tweeted messages of criticism before expressing herself how she wished “someone will let me talk about refugees”.

In a statement to Mashable, Sunrise’s Executive Producer said: “We are Sex And The City tragic at Sunrise. Our obsession may have gotten the better of us. We apologise for the bad acting and terrible costumes and we thank Kristin for being such a good sport.”

In 2011, Davis broke down in tears while relaying her mission to the Dadaab refugee camp in Kenya when appearing on BBC Breakfast news. Last year she penned an essay for Marie Claire on her experiences in Northern Uganda assisting refugees fleeing conflict in South Sudan, writing of the “ordinary people who have shown extraordinary resilience”.