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Angela Merkel, Benjamin Netanyahu, and the rather awkward case of the shadow moustache

One Jerusalem Post photographer captured the German Chancellor and the Israeli Prime Minister in a somewhat unfortunate press conference moment

Some images are so ridiculous, they simply cannot be faked.

One such golden example – of an actual picture taken in actual time and not edited – came as Jerusalem Post photographer Marc Israel Sellem snapped away during a joint press conference held by German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Jerusalem to commemorate 50 years of diplomatic ties between the countries.

He managed to capture Netanyahu mid-catalogue point, as he gestured across the stage.

Unfortunately for the two leaders, the resultant shadow gave Merkel a faux moustache not unlike that of another, far less reputed, German leader - Adolf Hitler.

The picture is currently doing the viral rounds on the internet, and has been picked up by news sites the world over.


The Jerusalem Post, however, was not so keen to run the prints – despite a number of their journalists sharing the image on Twitter.

"Just want to clarify that none of the higher-ups at JPost are pushing that picture. It's not on our site and won't be in the newspaper," reporter Lahav Harkov tweeted.

"@cymruisrael It's a real picture, not photoshopped. Obviously this wasn't Netanyahu's intention," she wrote to one user in a second post.

In more serious news, the historic conference was arranged to discuss calls for a boycott on Israeli goods produced in Israeli Settlements in the West Bank – a notion Merkel said she did not support. Germany is obliged, as a member of the European Union, to comply with product labelling guidelines in relation to such goods.

Merkel also declared Iran to be a potential threat to Israel and other European countries, but refused to  endorse Netanyahu's demands for Tehran to abandon all nuclear projects under negotiated deals with other world powers.