John Terry voted Dad of the Year

England football captain John Terry today added another trophy to his collection by winning the Dad of the Year award.



Terry, 28, the father of three year old twins, Georgie John and Summer Rose, came top of a poll of UK adults, beating last year's winner Peter Andre into second place.



The current political climate had an impact on Gordon Brown's popularity with the Prime Minister only receiving five per cent of the vote, a drop from 13 per cent last year.



John Terry's wife, Toni Terry, gave birth to the twins in May 2006, but he narrowly missed the birth of his children despite a frantic rush from the England camp in Portugal.



The Chelsea captain was delighted to win the Daddies Sauce survey.



He said: "It's a great honour to be voted Dad of the Year. I have won many trophies in my career but I'm proud to say that this is up there with all of them.



"Georgie and Summer are great kids and I love them both dearly.



"My family mean the world to me and receiving this award has made me feel extremely proud.



"Being with the kids and watching them grow up and learning new things every day is a privilege and I'm honoured to receive this award."



Indiana Jones was the most popular fictional character that people would like as their father, topping the poll with 42 per cent.



Homer Simpson finished second in the vote with 19 per cent and mobster Tony Soprano came in third.



Chocolate and alcohol were the most popular Father's Day presents this year with 77 per cent of people saying they would buy their father a gift.



Father's Day, however, still lags behind Mother's Day in terms of popularity.



Royal Mail statistics from last year show that over 13 million cards are sent on Mother's Day compared to 7 million on Father's Day.

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