Rashida Jones: Porn documentary producer says young women aren't aware of 'physical cost' of the industry

The actor produced the film Hot Girls Wanted and cautioned young women against joining the industry

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The Independent Online

Rashida Jones has spoken out against the "pornification" of culture, arguing that young women are exploited by the industry as it makes them believe the work is glamorous.

Speaking to Vice, Jones explained: "I have no problem with porn – also, it doesn’t matter if I have any kind of problem with porn, because it’s here to stay.

"I personally have no problem with porn as adult entertainment. I think it’s great that we have the freedom to explore our sexual fantasies, and that there’s tools to do that. The problem with me is that there’s no regulation in the industry – the average age someone watches their first porn is 11.

"For someone to learn about sex from porn, I think is really dangerous, and I think it happens a lot."

Jones has spoken out in the past against the pop culture climate for extreme sexualisation, and described it as: "Here is the bottom of my ass".

She has previously spoken out against the industry, saying that "because [porn is] performative, women aren’t feeling joy."

Her documentary Hot Girls Wanted examines how young women are lured into working in pornography with the promise of being famous, only to end up in cities such as Miami expected to make "amateur porn".

Jones explains that this genre - which is still fully scripted and operated like a regular film - focuses on plots that are "sort of like catching young, innocent girls off guard".

She explains: "Generally if you’re 18 and go to Miami, you’re done in a year, because there’s not enough amateur jobs for you. You can get some other jobs, but the niche stuff pays more, and the niche stuff is harder on your body. The pay can be $800, $1000 a shoot, but they still have to pay for hair and nails and make-up and travel and clothes – plus, they’re trying to live in a lavish way, so it ends up not being cost-effective. It’s not worth it."

Jones argues that the struggle for cash means women end up doing more extreme stuff.

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The cast of Parks and Recreation celebrating their 100th episode last year

The Parks and Recreation actor adds that her experience while making the documentary shows that the women who make this type of porn have generally only just turned 18 and may not understand the impact of the work.

"[There's the] psychological, emotional, physiological – the physical cost of having sex for a living. [You’re] thinking about the fame part of it, so you might not be the best candidate to make a decision for yourself."

Liz Curran of anti-violence charity Women's Support Project argues that pornography is inherently harmful and there's no way women can gain respect from it.

She told The Independent: "In a society where we want young women to be equal – accepting porn undermines the equality and independence of these young women.

"Women who need any support after commercial sexual exploitation should get in touch with the Object campaign or UK Feminista and they will put you in touch with the right people."

Curran argued that "healthy relationships based on respect and consent is such a contrast to pornography."

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